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Impact of maternal high fat diet on hypothalamic transcriptome in neonatal Sprague Dawley rats

Barrand, Sanna, Crowley, Tamsyn M, Wood-Bradley, Ryan J, De Jong, Kirstie Anne and Armitage, James A 2017, Impact of maternal high fat diet on hypothalamic transcriptome in neonatal Sprague Dawley rats, PLoS one, vol. 12, no. 12, pp. 1-16, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0189492.

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Title Impact of maternal high fat diet on hypothalamic transcriptome in neonatal Sprague Dawley rats
Formatted title Impact of maternal high fat diet on hypothalamic transcriptome in neonatal Sprague Dawley rats
Author(s) Barrand, Sanna
Crowley, Tamsyn MORCID iD for Crowley, Tamsyn M orcid.org/0000-0002-3698-8917
Wood-Bradley, Ryan J
De Jong, Kirstie Anne
Armitage, James AORCID iD for Armitage, James A orcid.org/0000-0002-3762-0911
Journal name PLoS one
Volume number 12
Issue number 12
Article ID e0189492
Start page 1
End page 16
Total pages 16
Publisher Public Library of Science
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2017-12-14
ISSN 1932-6203
Keyword(s) animals
animals, newborn
diet, high-fat
female
hypothalamus
phenotype
pregnancy
rats
rats, Sprague-Dawley
transcriptome
science & technology
multidisciplinary sciences
Summary Maternal consumption of a high fat diet during early development has been shown to impact the formation of hypothalamic neurocircuitry, thereby contributing to imbalances in appetite and energy homeostasis and increasing the risk of obesity in subsequent generations. Early in postnatal life, the neuronal projections responsible for energy homeostasis develop in response to appetite-related peptides such as leptin. To date, no study characterises the genome-wide transcriptional changes that occur in response to exposure to high fat diet during this critical window. We explored the effects of maternal high fat diet consumption on hypothalamic gene expression in Sprague Dawley rat offspring at postnatal day 10. RNA-sequencing enabled discovery of differentially expressed genes between offspring of dams fed a high fat diet and offspring of control diet fed dams. Female high fat diet offspring displayed altered expression of 86 genes (adjusted P-value<0.05), including genes coding for proteins of the extra cellular matrix, particularly Collagen 1a1 (Col1a1), Col1a2, Col3a1, and the imprinted Insulin-like growth factor 2 (Igf2) gene. Male high fat diet offspring showed significant changes in collagen genes (Col1a1 and Col3a1) and significant upregulation of two genes involved in regulation of dopamine availability in the brain, tyrosine hydroxylase (Th) and dopamine reuptake transporter Slc6a3 (also known as Dat1). Transcriptional changes were accompanied by increased body weight, body fat and body length in the high fat diet offspring, as well as altered blood glucose and plasma leptin. Transcriptional changes identified in the hypothalamus of offspring of high fat diet mothers could alter neuronal projection formation during early development leading to abnormalities in the neuronal circuitry controlling appetite in later life, hence priming offspring to the development of obesity.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0189492
Field of Research MD Multidisciplinary
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, Barrand et al
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30109083

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.