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Weight management during pregnancy: a qualitative study of women's and care providers' experiences and perspectives

Holton, Sara, East, Chrsitine and Fisher, Jane 2017, Weight management during pregnancy: a qualitative study of women's and care providers' experiences and perspectives, BMC pregnancy and childbirth, vol. 17, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.1186/s12884-017-1538-7.

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Title Weight management during pregnancy: a qualitative study of women's and care providers' experiences and perspectives
Author(s) Holton, SaraORCID iD for Holton, Sara orcid.org/0000-0001-9294-7872
East, Chrsitine
Fisher, Jane
Journal name BMC pregnancy and childbirth
Volume number 17
Article ID 351
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2017-10-11
ISSN 1471-2393
1471-2393
Keyword(s) Australia
Midwives
Obesity
Pregnant women
Prenatal care
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Body Mass Index
Female
Midwifery
Nurse Midwives
Obesity Management
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications
Qualitative Research
Victoria
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Obstetrics & Gynecology
POST-PARTUM
OBESE
OVERWEIGHT
CONCEPTION
OUTCOMES
KG/M(2)
STIGMA
MOTHER
GAIN
Summary Background
Obesity during pregnancy is a serious health problem for women and their children. Despite the high prevalence of high body mass index (BMI) among women of reproductive age in high-income countries, there is insufficient evidence to inform practice and policy about weight management for women with high BMI who are pregnant. The aim of this project was to describe women’s and midwives’ experiences and perspectives of care for weight management during pregnancy in Melbourne, Australia.

Methods
A qualitative study. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with pregnant women and midwives. Transcripts were analysed thematically.

Results
A total of 17 women and 2 midwives were interviewed. Five themes were identified: 1. Reluctance to and difficulties discussing weight and its implications; 2. Barriers to providing appropriate pregnancy care for women with high BMI; 3. Inconsistent weighing practices; 4. Beliefs about the causes of obesity; and 5. Opportunities to assist women to manage their weight. Although most women were satisfied with the pregnancy care they had received, both women and midwives expressed concerns about effective weight management during pregnancy. These included constraints on discussing weight, difficulties accessing appropriate resources and additional support from other health care providers, and inconsistent weighing practices.

Conclusions
The findings suggest that women with high BMI would benefit from additional information and support about weight management prior to conception, during pregnancy, and postnatally.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12884-017-1538-7
Field of Research 1114 Paediatrics And Reproductive Medicine
1117 Public Health And Health Services
1110 Nursing
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30109139

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.