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A single dose of prednisolone as a modulator of undercarboxylated osteocalcin and insulin sensitivity post-exercise in healthy young men: a study protocol

Levinger, Itamar, Brennan-Speranza, Tara C., Stepto, Nigel K., Jerums, George, Parker, Lewan, McConell, Glenn K., Anderson, Mitchell, Garnham, Andrew, Hare, David L., Ebeling, Peter R. and Seeman, Ego 2016, A single dose of prednisolone as a modulator of undercarboxylated osteocalcin and insulin sensitivity post-exercise in healthy young men: a study protocol, JMIR research protocols, vol. 5, no. 2, pp. 1-7, doi: 10.2196/resprot.5119.

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Title A single dose of prednisolone as a modulator of undercarboxylated osteocalcin and insulin sensitivity post-exercise in healthy young men: a study protocol
Author(s) Levinger, Itamar
Brennan-Speranza, Tara C.
Stepto, Nigel K.
Jerums, George
Parker, Lewan
McConell, Glenn K.
Anderson, Mitchell
Garnham, Andrew
Hare, David L.
Ebeling, Peter R.
Seeman, Ego
Journal name JMIR research protocols
Volume number 5
Issue number 2
Article ID e78
Start page 1
End page 7
Total pages 7
Publisher JMIR Publications
Place of publication Toronto, Ont.
Publication date 2016-04
ISSN 1929-0748
Keyword(s) bone metabolism
exercise
glycaemic control
prednisolone
undercarboxylated osteocalcin
Summary Background: Undercarboxylated osteocalcin (ucOC) increases insulin sensitivity in mice. In humans, data are supportive, but the studies are mostly cross-sectional. Exercise increases whole-body insulin sensitivity, in part via ucOC, while acute glucocorticoid treatment suppresses ucOC in humans and mice.

Objectives: A single dose of prednisolone reduces the rise in ucOC produced by exercise, which partly accounts for the failed increase in insulin sensitivity following exercise.

Methods: Healthy young men (n=12) aged 18 to 40 years will be recruited. Initial assessments will include analysis of fasting blood, body composition, aerobic power (VO2peak), and peak heart rate. Participants will then be randomly allocated, double-blind, to a single dose of 20 mg of prednisolone or placebo. The two experimental trials will involve 30 minutes of interval exercise (90%-95% peak heart rate), followed by 3 hours of recovery and 2 hours of euglycaemic- hyperinsulinaemic clamp (insulin clamp). Seven muscle biopsies and blood samples will be obtained at rest, following exercise and post-insulin clamps.

Results: The study is funded by the National Heart Foundation of Australia and Victoria University. Enrollment has already commenced and data collection will be completed in 2016.

Conclusion: If the hypothesis is confirmed, the study will provide novel insights into the potential role of ucOC in insulin sensitivity in human subjects and will elucidate pathways involved in exercise-induced insulin sensitivity.
Language eng
DOI 10.2196/resprot.5119
Field of Research 110602 Exercise Physiology
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Levinger et al.
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30109165

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.