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Magnetic resonance imaging for assessment of cerebrovascular reactivity and its relationship to cognition: a systematic review

Catchlove, Sarah J., Pipingas, Andrew, Hughes, Matthew E. and Macpherson, Helen 2018, Magnetic resonance imaging for assessment of cerebrovascular reactivity and its relationship to cognition: a systematic review, BMC Neuroscience, vol. 19, no. 21, pp. 1-15, doi: 10.1186/s12868-018-0421-4.

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Title Magnetic resonance imaging for assessment of cerebrovascular reactivity and its relationship to cognition: a systematic review
Author(s) Catchlove, Sarah J.
Pipingas, Andrew
Hughes, Matthew E.
Macpherson, HelenORCID iD for Macpherson, Helen orcid.org/0000-0002-3603-9359
Journal name BMC Neuroscience
Volume number 19
Issue number 21
Start page 1
End page 15
Total pages 15
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2018-04
ISSN 1471-2202
Keyword(s) Brain
Cerebrovascular reactivity
Cognition
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)
Vasodilation
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Neurosciences
Neurosciences & Neurology
IMPAIRED CEREBRAL VASOREACTIVITY
TRANSCRANIAL DOPPLER
ALZHEIMERS-DISEASE
MULTIPLE-SCLEROSIS
VASCULAR CONTRIBUTIONS
VASOMOTOR REACTIVITY
ARTERIAL STIFFNESS
CARBON-DIOXIDE
RISK-FACTORS
DEMENTIA
Summary BACKGROUND: Cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) refers to the responsiveness of cerebral vasculature to vasoactive stimuli. CVR is an indicator of brain health and can be assessed using vasodilatory techniques and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Using such approaches, some researchers have explored the relationship between CVR and cognition; here we systematically review this work.

RESULTS: We extracted information pertaining to: (1) study location and design, participant characteristics, sample sizes, (2) design of vascular challenge, end-tidal CO 2 (etCO 2 ) concentrations (if applicable), (3) MRI protocol, (4) cognitive assessment, (5) CVR values, and outcomes of statistical analyses with cognitive tests. Five studies assessed participants with cognitive impairment compared to controls, one studied patients with multiple sclerosis with or without cognitive impairment compared to controls, one examined patients with moyamoya disease with or without cognitive impairment, two investigated patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and one was a cross-sectional study with younger and older healthy adults. Cognition was typically probed using the MMSE and tests of executive function, while a number of vasodilatory techniques were employed.

CONCLUSION: CVR was associated with cognition in six of ten studies, but heterogeneity of study samples, designs and vasodilatory methods may have a role in the inconsistent findings. We make recommendations for future research that includes use of a multi-domain cognitive assessment and standardised hypercapnic challenge with MRI.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12868-018-0421-4
Field of Research 1109 Neurosciences
1702 Cognitive Science
0601 Biochemistry And Cell Biology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30109173

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.