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A pathway to reduce energy consumption in the thermal stabilization process of carbon fiber production

Nunna, Srinivas, Maghe, Maxime, Fakhrhoseini, Seyed Mousa, Polisetti, Bhargav and Naebe, Minoo 2018, A pathway to reduce energy consumption in the thermal stabilization process of carbon fiber production, Energies, vol. 11, no. 5, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.3390/en11051145.

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Title A pathway to reduce energy consumption in the thermal stabilization process of carbon fiber production
Author(s) Nunna, Srinivas
Maghe, Maxime
Fakhrhoseini, Seyed MousaORCID iD for Fakhrhoseini, Seyed Mousa orcid.org/0000-0001-9145-1744
Polisetti, Bhargav
Naebe, MinooORCID iD for Naebe, Minoo orcid.org/0000-0002-0607-6327
Journal name Energies
Volume number 11
Issue number 5
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2018-05
ISSN 1996-1073
Keyword(s) microstructure
carbon fibers
polyacrylonitrile
thermal stabilization
recirculation fan frequency
IR imaging
science & technology
technology
energy & fuels
Summary Process parameters, especially in the thermal stabilization of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fibers, play a critical role in controlling the cost and properties of the resultant carbon fibers. This study aimed to efficiently handle the energy expense areas during carbon fiber manufacturing without reducing the quality of carbon fibers. We introduced a new parameter (recirculation fan frequency) in the stabilization stage and studied its influence on the evolution of the structure and properties of fibers. Initially, the progress of the cyclization reaction in the fiber cross-sections with respect to fan frequencies (35, 45, and 60 Hz) during stabilization was analyzed using the Australian Synchrotron-high resolution infrared imaging technique. A parabolic trend in the evolution of cyclic structures was observed in the fiber cross-sections during the initial stages of stabilization; however, it was transformed to a uniform trend at the end of stabilization for all fan frequencies. Simultaneously, the microstructure and property variations at each stage of manufacturing were assessed. We identified nominal structural variations with respect to fan frequencies in the intermediate stages of thermal stabilization, which were reduced during the carbonization process. No statistically significant variations were observed between the tensile properties of fibers. These observations suggested that, when using a lower fan frequency (35 Hz), it was possible to manufacture carbon fibers with a similar performance to those produced using a higher fan frequency (60 Hz). As a result, this study provided an opportunity to reduce the energy consumption during carbon fiber manufacturing.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/en11051145
Field of Research 09 Engineering
02 Physical Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, the authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30109193

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Institute for Frontier Materials
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.