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Trajectories of early childhood developmental skills and early adolescent psychotic experiences: findings from the ALSPAC UK birth cohort

Hameed, Mohajer A., Lingam, Raghu, Zammit, Stanley, Salvi, Giovanni, Sullivan, Sarah and Lewis, Andrew J. 2018, Trajectories of early childhood developmental skills and early adolescent psychotic experiences: findings from the ALSPAC UK birth cohort, Frontiers in psychology, vol. 8, pp. 1-11, doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2017.02314.

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Title Trajectories of early childhood developmental skills and early adolescent psychotic experiences: findings from the ALSPAC UK birth cohort
Author(s) Hameed, Mohajer A.
Lingam, Raghu
Zammit, Stanley
Salvi, Giovanni
Sullivan, Sarah
Lewis, Andrew J.ORCID iD for Lewis, Andrew J. orcid.org/0000-0002-2519-7976
Journal name Frontiers in psychology
Volume number 8
Article ID 2314
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher Frontiers
Place of publication Lausanne, Switzerland
Publication date 2018-01-09
ISSN 1664-1078
Keyword(s) ALSPAC birth cohort
adolescence
psychotic experiences
trajectories of early childhood development
Social Sciences
Psychology, Multidisciplinary
Psychology
JERUSALEM INFANT-DEVELOPMENT
COMMUNITY SAMPLE
ADULT SCHIZOPHRENIA
GENERAL-POPULATION
HIGH-RISK
NONCLINICAL POPULATION
NEUROMOTOR PRECURSORS
DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS
UNAFFECTED SIBLINGS
YOUNG-ADULTS
Summary Objective: The aim of this study was to use prospective data from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) to examine association between trajectories of early childhood developmental skills and psychotic experiences (PEs) in early adolescence. 

Method: This study examined data from n = 6790 children from the ALSPAC cohort who participated in a semi-structured interview to assess PEs at age 12. Child development was measured using parental report at 6, 18, 30, and 42 months of age using a questionnaire of items adapted from the Denver Developmental Screening Test - II. Latent class growth analysis was used to generate trajectories over time for measures of fine and gross motor development, social, and communication skills. Logistic regression was used to investigate associations between developmental trajectories in each of these early developmental domains and PEs at age 12. 

Results: The results provided evidence that decline rather than enduringly poor social (adjusted OR = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.10-1.92, p = 0.044) and communication skills (adjusted OR 1.12, 95% CI = 1.03-1.22, p = 0.010) is predictive of suspected or definite PEs in early adolescence, than those with stable and/or improving skills. Motor skills did not display the same pattern of association; although gender specific effects provided evidence that only declining pattern of fine motor skills was associated with suspected and definite PEs in males compared to females (interaction OR = 1.47, 95% CI = 1.09-1.97, p = 0.012). 

Conclusion: Findings suggest that decline rather than persistent impairment in social and communication skills were most predictive of PEs in early adolescence. Findings are discussed in terms of study's strengths, limitations, and clinical implications.
Language eng
DOI 10.3389/fpsyg.2017.02314
Field of Research 1701 Psychology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, Hameed, Lingam, Zammit, Salvi, Sullivan and Lewis.
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30109200

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
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