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Improving cardiometabolic health with diet, physical activity, and breaking up sitting: what about sleep?

Vincent, Grace E, Jay, Sarah M, Sargent, Charli, Vandelanotte, Corneel, Ridgers, Nicola D and Ferguson, Sally A 2017, Improving cardiometabolic health with diet, physical activity, and breaking up sitting: what about sleep?, Frontiers in physiology, vol. 8, pp. 1-7, doi: 10.3389/fphys.2017.00865.

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Title Improving cardiometabolic health with diet, physical activity, and breaking up sitting: what about sleep?
Author(s) Vincent, Grace E
Jay, Sarah M
Sargent, Charli
Vandelanotte, Corneel
Ridgers, Nicola DORCID iD for Ridgers, Nicola D orcid.org/0000-0001-5713-3515
Ferguson, Sally A
Journal name Frontiers in physiology
Volume number 8
Article ID 865
Start page 1
End page 7
Total pages 7
Publisher Frontiers Media
Place of publication Lausanne, Switzerland
Publication date 2017-11
ISSN 1664-042X
Keyword(s) exercise
physical activity
sedentary behavior
sitting breaks
sleep restriction
science & technology
life sciences & biomedicine
physiology
Summary Cardiometabolic disease poses a serious health and economic burden worldwide and its prevalence is predicted to increase. Prolonged sitting, lack of physical activity, poor diet, and short sleep duration are ubiquitous behaviors in modern society, and all are independent risk factors in the development of cardiometabolic disease. Existing evidence demonstrates that breaking up prolonged periods of sitting is beneficial for cardiometabolic health, however, studies have not controlled for prior sleep duration. This article examines how prolonged sitting and short sleep duration independently contribute to cardiometabolic risk, and how breaking up sitting and obtaining adequate sleep may reduce this risk. We suggest that as prolonged sitting and short sleep duration influence the same cardiometabolic parameters, there is potential for short sleep to attenuate the positive impact of breaking up prolonged sitting with physical activity. Likewise, breaking up prolonged sitting and obtaining adequate sleep together could improve predictors of cardiometabolic disease, i.e., the combined effect may be stronger than either alone. To explore these perspectives, we propose a research agenda to investigate the relationship between breaking up prolonged sitting with physical activity and short sleep duration. This will provide an evidence-base for informing the design of interventions to reduce the burden of cardiometabolic disease on communities worldwide.
Language eng
DOI 10.3389/fphys.2017.00865
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, Vincent, Jay, Sargent, Vandelanotte, Ridgers and Ferguson
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30109210

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.