Openly accessible

How food companies influence evidence and opinion–straight from the horse’s mouth

Sacks, Gary, Swinburn, Boyd, Cameron, Adrian and Ruskin, Gary 2018, How food companies influence evidence and opinion–straight from the horse’s mouth, Critical public health, vol. 28, no. 2, pp. 253-256, doi: 10.1080/09581596.2017.1371844.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
sacks-howfood-2018.pdf Published version application/pdf 402.55KB 28

Title How food companies influence evidence and opinion–straight from the horse’s mouth
Author(s) Sacks, GaryORCID iD for Sacks, Gary orcid.org/0000-0001-9736-1539
Swinburn, Boyd
Cameron, AdrianORCID iD for Cameron, Adrian orcid.org/0000-0002-0568-5497
Ruskin, Gary
Journal name Critical public health
Volume number 28
Issue number 2
Start page 253
End page 256
Total pages 4
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2018-03-15
ISSN 0958-1596
1469-3682
Summary The tactics used by the food industry to influence public policy have been well documented, but there is little direct evidence of the rationale behind food industry actions and their level of support from within individual companies. This paper provides an analysis of an email exchange (from 2015) between former senior executives of Coca-Cola to gain insider insight into ways in which the food industry seeks to influence policy-makers as well as scientific evidence and opinion with respect to nutrition and non-communicable disease (NCD) prevention. The results provide direct evidence that senior leaders in the food industry advocate for a deliberate and co-ordinated approach to influencing scientific evidence and expert opinion. The paper reveals industry strategies to use external organisations, including scientific bodies and medical associations, as tools to overcome the global scientific and regulatory challenges they face. This evidence highlights the deliberate approach used by the food industry to influence public policy and opinion in their favour. It also demonstrates the importance of identifying and managing potential conflicts of interest when assessing the evidence base and when making policy decisions related to nutrition and NCD prevention.
Language eng
DOI 10.1080/09581596.2017.1371844
Field of Research 1117 Public Health And Health Services
1608 Sociology
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No-Derivatives licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30109227

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Health and Social Development
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 4 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 3 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 73 Abstract Views, 29 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 11 Jun 2018, 12:08:42 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.