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Australian healthcare professionals' knowledge of and attitudes toward binge eating disorder

Cain, Belinda, Buck, Kimberly, Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, Matthew and Krug, Isabel 2017, Australian healthcare professionals' knowledge of and attitudes toward binge eating disorder, Frontiers in psychology, vol. 8, pp. 1-11, doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2017.01291.

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Title Australian healthcare professionals' knowledge of and attitudes toward binge eating disorder
Author(s) Cain, Belinda
Buck, Kimberly
Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, MatthewORCID iD for Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, Matthew orcid.org/0000-0003-1145-6057
Krug, Isabel
Journal name Frontiers in psychology
Volume number 8
Article ID 1291
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher Frontiers Media
Place of publication Lausanne, Switzerland
Publication date 2017-08-07
ISSN 1664-1078
Keyword(s) attitudes
binge eating disorder
diagnosis
eating disorders
knowledge
obesity
treatment
weight bias
Social Sciences
Psychology, Multidisciplinary
Psychology
COGNITIVE-BEHAVIORAL THERAPY
DIETETICS STUDENTS
COMMUNITY SAMPLE
MENTAL-HEALTH
HELP-SEEKING
FAT PHOBIA
OVERWEIGHT
CLINICIAN
Summary Objective: This study aimed to investigate Australian healthcare practitioners’ knowledge and attitudes toward binge eating disorder (BED).

Method: Participants were 175 healthcare professionals, who were randomized to one of two conditions that assessed diagnostic and treatment knowledge of either comorbid BED and obesity or only obesity via case vignette, as well as weight bias toward obese patients.

Results: Results suggested that participants demonstrated a reluctance to diagnose comorbid BED and obesity, that their knowledge of physical complications associated with BED was limited, and that they indicated a narrow range of evidence-based treatment options. When compared with levels of weight bias expressed by healthcare professionals in previous international studies, Australian clinicians were significantly less biased, however, still largely endorsed ‘negative’ attitudes toward obesity.

Conclusion: Findings suggest that future clinical training in eating disorders should therefore focus not only on diagnostic criteria, physical complications and treatment options, but also on practitioner attitudes toward eating and weight.
Language eng
DOI 10.3389/fpsyg.2017.01291
Field of Research 1701 Psychology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, Cain, Buck, Fuller-Tyszkiewicz and Krug.
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30109297

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.