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The differential effects of mindfulness and distraction on affect and body satisfaction following food consumption

Tsai, Alice, Hughes, Elizabeth K., Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, Matthew, Buck, Kimberly and Krug, Isabel 2017, The differential effects of mindfulness and distraction on affect and body satisfaction following food consumption, Frontiers in psychology, vol. 8, pp. 1-12, doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2017.01696.

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Title The differential effects of mindfulness and distraction on affect and body satisfaction following food consumption
Author(s) Tsai, Alice
Hughes, Elizabeth K.
Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, MatthewORCID iD for Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, Matthew orcid.org/0000-0003-1145-6057
Buck, Kimberly
Krug, Isabel
Journal name Frontiers in psychology
Volume number 8
Article ID 1696
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Publisher Frontiers Media
Place of publication Lausanne, Switzerland
Publication date 2017-09-27
ISSN 1664-1078
Keyword(s) distraction
eating pathology
experimental intervention
food consumption
mindfulness
Social Sciences
Psychology, Multidisciplinary
Psychology
BINGE-EATING DISORDER
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL
NEGATIVE AFFECT
BEHAVIOR-THERAPY
ATTITUDES TEST
DISSATISFACTION
WOMEN
IMAGE
ACCEPTANCE
RUMINATION
Summary This study investigated whether engaging in mindfulness following food consumption produced changes in affect and body satisfaction, as compared to a control distraction task. The moderating effects of eating pathology and neuroticism were also examined. A total of 110 female university students consumed food and water before engaging in either a mindfulness induction or a control distraction task. Participants completed trait measures of eating pathology and neuroticism at baseline, and measures of state affect and body satisfaction before and after food consumption, and after the induction. Results revealed that consuming food and water reduced positive affect. Unexpectedly, both the mindfulness group and distraction control group experienced similar improvements in negative affect and body satisfaction following the induction. Eating pathology and neuroticism did not moderate the observed changes. These findings suggest that both mindfulness and distraction may contribute to the effectiveness of treatments for disordered eating that incorporate both of these techniques, such as Dialectical Behavior Therapy.
Language eng
DOI 10.3389/fpsyg.2017.01696
Field of Research 1701 Psychology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, Tsai, Hughes, Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, Buck and Krug
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30109301

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.