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A tailored intervention to promote uptake of retinal screening among young adults with type 2 diabetes - an intervention mapping approach

Lake, Amelia J., Browne, Jessica L., Abraham, Charles, Tumino, Dee, Hines, Carolyn, Rees, Gwyneth and Speight, Jane 2018, A tailored intervention to promote uptake of retinal screening among young adults with type 2 diabetes - an intervention mapping approach, BMC health services research, vol. 18, pp. 1-18, doi: 10.1186/s12913-018-3188-5.

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Title A tailored intervention to promote uptake of retinal screening among young adults with type 2 diabetes - an intervention mapping approach
Author(s) Lake, Amelia J.ORCID iD for Lake, Amelia J. orcid.org/0000-0003-1068-2722
Browne, Jessica L.ORCID iD for Browne, Jessica L. orcid.org/0000-0001-7294-8114
Abraham, Charles
Tumino, Dee
Hines, Carolyn
Rees, Gwyneth
Speight, JaneORCID iD for Speight, Jane orcid.org/0000-0002-1204-6896
Journal name BMC health services research
Volume number 18
Article ID 396
Start page 1
End page 18
Total pages 18
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2018-05
ISSN 1472-6963
Keyword(s) Diabetic retinopathy
Health behaviour change
Intervention mapping
Needs assessment
Retinal screening
Type 2 diabetes
Young adults
Young-onset
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Health Care Sciences & Services
BEHAVIORAL SKILLS MODEL
SELF-CARE BEHAVIORS
QUALITATIVE-ANALYSIS
EYE EXAMINATIONS
HEALTH BEHAVIOR
ONSET
RETINOPATHY
MORTALITY
PEOPLE
YOUTH
Summary BACKGROUND: Young adults (18-39 years) with type 2 diabetes are at risk of early development and rapid progression of diabetic retinopathy, a leading cause of vision loss and blindness in working-age adults. Retinal screening is key to the early detection of diabetic retinopathy, with risk of vision loss significantly reduced by timely treatment thereafter. Despite this, retinal screening rates are low among this at-risk group. The objective of this study was to develop a theoretically-grounded, evidence-based retinal screening promotion leaflet, tailored to young adults with type 2 diabetes.

METHODS: Utilising the six steps of Intervention Mapping, our multidisciplinary planning team conducted a mixed-methods needs assessment (Step 1); identified modifiable behavioural determinants of screening behaviour and constructed a matrix of change objectives (Step 2); designed, reviewed and debriefed leaflet content with stakeholders (Steps 3 and 4); and developed program implementation and evaluation plans (Steps 5 and 6).

RESULTS: Step 1 included in-depth qualitative interviews (N = 10) and an online survey that recruited a nationally-representative sample (N = 227), both informed by literature review. The needs assessment highlighted the crucial roles of knowledge (about diabetic retinopathy and screening), perception of personal risk, awareness of the approval of significant others and engagement with healthcare team, on retinal screening intentions and uptake. In Step 2, we selected five modifiable behavioural determinants to be targeted: knowledge, attitudes, normative beliefs, intention, and behavioural skills. In Steps 3 and 4, the "Who is looking after your eyes?" leaflet was developed, containing persuasive messages targeting each determinant and utilising engaging, cohort-appropriate imagery. In Steps 5 and 6, we planned Statewide implementation and designed a randomised controlled trial to evaluate the leaflet.

CONCLUSIONS: This research provides an example of a systematic, evidence-based approach to the development of a simple health intervention designed to promote uptake of screening in accordance with national guidelines. The methods and findings illustrate how Intervention Mapping can be employed to develop tailored retinal screening promotion materials for specific priority populations. This paper has implications for future program planners and is intended to assist those wishing to use Intervention Mapping to create similar theoretically-driven, tailored resources.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12913-018-3188-5
Field of Research 1117 Public Health And Health Services
0807 Library And Information Studies
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30109307

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.