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Decisional balance and processes of change in community-recruited with moderate-high versus mild severity of cannabis dependence

López-Torrecillas, Francisca, López-Quirantes, Eva Maria, Maldonado, Antonio, Albein-Urios, Natalia, Rueda, M Del Mar and Verdejo-Garcia, Antonio 2017, Decisional balance and processes of change in community-recruited with moderate-high versus mild severity of cannabis dependence, PLoS One, vol. 12, no. 12, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0188476.

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Title Decisional balance and processes of change in community-recruited with moderate-high versus mild severity of cannabis dependence
Author(s) López-Torrecillas, Francisca
López-Quirantes, Eva Maria
Maldonado, Antonio
Albein-Urios, NataliaORCID iD for Albein-Urios, Natalia orcid.org/0000-0001-7841-018X
Rueda, M Del Mar
Verdejo-Garcia, Antonio
Journal name PLoS One
Volume number 12
Issue number 12
Article ID e0188476
Total pages 8
Publisher Public Library of Science
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2017-12-04
ISSN 1932-6203
Keyword(s) Adolescent
Adult
Behavior Therapy
Decision Making
Female
Humans
Male
Marijuana Abuse
Motivation
Severity of Illness Index
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Science & Technology
Multidisciplinary Sciences
Science & Technology - Other Topics
PSYCHOMETRIC PROPERTIES
NICOTINE DEPENDENCE
SMOKING-CESSATION
FAGERSTROM TEST
ALCOHOL-USE
SCALE SDS
BEHAVIORS
USERS
RELIABILITY
RELAPSERS
Summary Decisional Balance and Processes of Change are generally addressed in motivational interventions for the treatment of cannabis use disorders. However, specific aspects of these multifaceted constructs, with greater relevance for severe cannabis users, need to be ascertained to enable better interventions. This study aimed to compare the different facets of decisional balance and processes of change between mild and severe cannabis users in a community-based sample of young undergraduates. Thirty-one severe cannabis users and 31 mild cannabis users, indicated with the Severity of Dependence Scale, were assessed using the Decisional Balance Questionnaire (DBQ) and the Processes of Change Questionnaire (PCQ). We found that severe cannabis users had higher scores in the DBQ dimensions of Utilitarian Gains for the Self, Utilitarian Gains for Significant Others, and Self-approval, as well as in the total subscale of Gains but not Losses. The group of severe cannabis users also had higher scores in the PCQ dimensions of Self-revaluations and Counter-conditioning. Our results pinpoint specific dimensions of Decisional Balance and Processes of Change that are endorsed by severe cannabis users. This knowledge could be applied to inform motivational interventions targeting severe cannabis users.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0188476
Field of Research 170199 Psychology not elsewhere classified
MD Multidisciplinary
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, Lopez-Torrecillas et al.
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30109346

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.