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Cross sectional associations of screen time and outdoor play with social skills in preschool children

Hinkley, Trina, Brown, Helen, Carson, Valerie and Teychenne, Megan 2018, Cross sectional associations of screen time and outdoor play with social skills in preschool children, PLoS one, vol. 13, no. 4, pp. 1-15, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0193700.

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Title Cross sectional associations of screen time and outdoor play with social skills in preschool children
Author(s) Hinkley, TrinaORCID iD for Hinkley, Trina orcid.org/0000-0003-2742-8579
Brown, HelenORCID iD for Brown, Helen orcid.org/0000-0002-5460-3654
Carson, Valerie
Teychenne, MeganORCID iD for Teychenne, Megan orcid.org/0000-0002-7293-8255
Journal name PLoS one
Volume number 13
Issue number 4
Article ID e0193700
Start page 1
End page 15
Total pages 15
Publisher Public Library of Science
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2018-04-04
ISSN 1932-6203
Keyword(s) behavior
physical activity
children
mothers
mental health
psychiatry
parenting behavior
computer games
games
Summary Screen time and physical activity behaviours develop during the crucial early childhood period (0-5 years) and impact multiple health and developmental outcomes, including psychosocial wellbeing. Social skills, one component of psychosocial wellbeing, are vital for children's school readiness and future mental health. This study investigates potential associations of screen time and outdoor play (as a proxy for physical activity) with social skills. Cross sectional data were available for 575 mothers with a child (54% boys) aged 2-5 years. Mothers reported their child's screen time, outdoor play time and social skills (Adaptive Social Behavior Inventory; ASBI). Multiple linear regression analyses assessed associations of screen and outdoor play time (Model 1) and compliance with screen time and physical activity recommendations (Model 2) with three ASBI subscales. Boys and girls spent a mean of 2.0 and 2.2 hours per day in screen time, and 3.3 and 2.9 hours per day in outdoor play, respectively. Girls scores for express and comply skills were significantly higher than boys (p<0.005). After applying the Benjamini-Hochberg Procedure to adjust for multiple associations, children's television/DVD/video viewing was inversely associated with their compliant scores (B = -0.35 95% CI -0.26, -0.14; p = 0.001) and outdoor play time was positively associated with both expressive (B = 0.20 95% CI 0.07, 0.34; p = 0.004) and compliant (B = 0.22 95% CI 0.08, 0.36; p = 0.002) scores. Findings indicate that television/DVD/video viewing may be adversely, and outdoor play favourably, associated with preschool children's social skills. Future research is required to identify the direction of causation and explore potential mechanisms of association.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0193700
Field of Research 110603 Motor Control
MD Multidisciplinary
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2018, Hinkley et al.
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30109351

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.