Openly accessible

Depression and diabetes distress in adults with type 2 diabetes: results from the Australian National Diabetes Audit (ANDA) 2016

Nanayakkara, Natalie, Pease, Anthony, Ranasinha, Sanjeeva, Wischer, Natalie, Andrikopoulos, Sofianos, Speight, Jane, de Courten, Barbora and Zoungas, Sophia 2018, Depression and diabetes distress in adults with type 2 diabetes: results from the Australian National Diabetes Audit (ANDA) 2016, Scientific reports, vol. 8, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.1038/s41598-018-26138-5.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
speight-depressionand-2018.pdf Published version application/pdf 989.46KB 4

Title Depression and diabetes distress in adults with type 2 diabetes: results from the Australian National Diabetes Audit (ANDA) 2016
Author(s) Nanayakkara, Natalie
Pease, Anthony
Ranasinha, Sanjeeva
Wischer, Natalie
Andrikopoulos, Sofianos
Speight, JaneORCID iD for Speight, Jane orcid.org/0000-0002-1204-6896
de Courten, Barbora
Zoungas, Sophia
Journal name Scientific reports
Volume number 8
Article ID 7846
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2018-05-18
ISSN 2045-2322
Keyword(s) type 2 diabetes
depression
stress
mental health
Australian National Diabetes Audit
science & technology
multidisciplinary sciences
Summary This study explores the prevalence of, and factors associated with, likely depression and diabetes distress in adults with type 2 diabetes in a large, national sample. Australian National Diabetes Audit data were analysed from adults with type 2 diabetes attending 50 diabetes centres. The Brief Case find for Depression and Diabetes Distress Score 17 were administered to screen for likely depression and diabetes-related distress, respectively. A total of 2,552 adults with type 2 diabetes participated: (mean ± SD) age was 63 ± 13 years, diabetes duration was 12 ± 10 years, and HbA1c was 8 ± 2%. Twenty-nine percent of patients had likely depression, 7% had high diabetes distress, and 5% had both. Difficulty following dietary recommendations, smoking, forgetting medications, and diabetes distress were all associated with greater odds of depression whereas higher own health rating was associated with lower odds (all p < 0.02). Female gender, increasing HbA1c, insulin use, difficulty following dietary recommendations and depression were all associated with greater odds of diabetes distress & older age, higher own health rating and monitoring blood glucose levels as recommended were associated with lower odds (all p < 0.04). Depression was associated with sub-optimal self-care, while diabetes distress was associated with higher HbA1c and sub-optimal self-care.
Language eng
DOI 10.1038/s41598-018-26138-5
Field of Research 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 920104 Diabetes
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30109360

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 20 Abstract Views, 6 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 12 Jun 2018, 12:23:00 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.