To what extent do smokers make spontaneous quit attempts and what are the implications for smoking cessation maintenance? Findings from the International Tobacco Control Four Country Survey

Cooper, J, Borland, R, Yong, Hua, McNeill, A, Murray, RL, O'Connor, RJ and Cummings, KM 2010, To what extent do smokers make spontaneous quit attempts and what are the implications for smoking cessation maintenance? Findings from the International Tobacco Control Four Country Survey, Nicotine and Tobacco Research, vol. 12, no. SUPPL. 1, doi: 10.1093/ntr/ntq052.

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Title To what extent do smokers make spontaneous quit attempts and what are the implications for smoking cessation maintenance? Findings from the International Tobacco Control Four Country Survey
Author(s) Cooper, J
Borland, R
Yong, HuaORCID iD for Yong, Hua orcid.org/0000-0001-8167-6173
McNeill, A
Murray, RL
O'Connor, RJ
Cummings, KM
Journal name Nicotine and Tobacco Research
Volume number 12
Issue number SUPPL. 1
Publisher Oxford University Press
Place of publication Oxford, Eng.
Publication date 2010-10-01
ISSN 1462-2203
1469-994X
Summary Aim: To assess the extent to which quit attempts are spontaneous and to evaluate if this is a determinant of smoking cessation maintenance, with better control for memory effects. Methods: We use data from 3,022 smokers who made quit attempts between Waves 4 and 5 and/or Waves 5 and 6 of the International Tobacco Control Four country survey. Outcomes (quitting for 6 months) were confirmed at the next wave for cases where the attempt began within the previous 6 months. We assessed the length of delay between the decision to quit and implementation and whether the attempt followed a "spur-of-the-moment" decision or some serious prior consideration. Outcomes were modeled using generalized estimating equations. Results: Prior consideration of quitting was unrelated to the outcome, but there were complex relationships for the delay between choosing a quit day and implementation. Those who reported quitting on the day they decided and those who delayed for 1 week or more had comparable rates of 6-month abstinence. Delaying for 1-6 days was associated with a greater relapse rate than those who quit on the day, although this effect became nonsignificant in multivariate analyses. Conclusions: Quitting is on most smokers' minds regularly and most attempts are not preceded by a long lead in period following the decision to try. Neither prior consideration nor delay between the decision to quit and implementation was clearly related to outcomes. Previous findings of greater success for spontaneous quit attempts may be because they conflate setting a date in advance with planning and also perhaps some differential memory effects.
DOI 10.1093/ntr/ntq052
Field of Research 1117 Public Health And Health Services
1103 Clinical Sciences
1505 Marketing
HERDC Research category CN.1 Other journal article
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30109510

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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