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The impact of gastrointestinal symptoms and dermatological injuries on nutritional intake and hydration status during ultramarathon events

Costa, Ricarso JS, Snipe, Rhiannon, Camões-Costa, Vera, Scheer, Volker and Murray, Andrew 2016, The impact of gastrointestinal symptoms and dermatological injuries on nutritional intake and hydration status during ultramarathon events, Sports medicine - open, vol. 2, pp. 1-14, doi: 10.1186/s40798-015-0041-9.

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Title The impact of gastrointestinal symptoms and dermatological injuries on nutritional intake and hydration status during ultramarathon events
Author(s) Costa, Ricarso JS
Snipe, Rhiannon
Camões-Costa, Vera
Scheer, Volker
Murray, Andrew
Journal name Sports medicine - open
Volume number 2
Article ID 16
Start page 1
End page 14
Total pages 14
Publisher SpringerOpen
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016
ISSN 2199-1170
Keyword(s) gastrointestinal symptom
hydration status
carbohydrate intake
nutritional intake
endurance sport
Summary BACKGROUND: Debilitating gastrointestinal symptoms (GIS) and dermatological injuries (DI) are common during and after endurance events and have been linked to performance decrements, event withdrawal, and issues requiring medical attention. The study aimed to determine whether GIS and DI affect food and fluid intake, and nutritional and hydration status, of ultramarathon runners during multi-stage (MSUM) and 24-h continuous (24 h) ultramarathons.

METHODS: Ad libitum food and fluid intakes of ultramarathon runners (MSUM n = 54; 24 h n = 22) were recorded throughout both events and analysed by dietary analysis software. Body mass and urinary ketones were determined, and blood samples were taken, before and immediately after running. A medical log was used to monitor symptoms and injuries throughout both events.

RESULTS: GIS were reported by 85 and 73 % of ultramarathon runners throughout MSUM and 24 h, respectively. GIS during MSUM were associated with reduced total daily, during, and post-stage energy and macronutrient intakes (p < 0.05), whereas GIS during 24 h did not alter nutritional variables. Throughout the MSUM 89 % of ultramarathon runners reported DI. DI during MSUM were associated with reduced carbohydrate (p < 0.05) intake during running and protein intake post-stage (p < 0.05). DI during 24 h were low; thus, comparative analyses were not possible. Daily, during running, and post-stage energy, macronutrient and water intake variables were observed to be lower with severity of GIS and DI (p < 0.05) throughout the MSUM only.

CONCLUSIONS: GIS during the MSUM, but not the 24 h, compromised nutritional intake. DI presence and severity also compromised nutrient intake during running and recovery in the MSUM.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s40798-015-0041-9
Copyright notice ©2016, Costa et al.
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30109527

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.