Openly accessible

Plover parents care more for young of the opposite sex

Lees, Daniel Terry, Sherman, Craig DH, Kostoglou, Kristal, Tan, Laura Xin Lu, Maguire, Grainne S, Dann, Peter and Weston, Michael A 2018, Plover parents care more for young of the opposite sex, Behavioral ecology, vol. 29, no. 4, pp. 933-938, doi: 10.1093/beheco/ary052.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Plover parents care more for young of the opposite sex
Author(s) Lees, Daniel Terry
Sherman, Craig DHORCID iD for Sherman, Craig DH orcid.org/0000-0003-2099-0462
Kostoglou, Kristal
Tan, Laura Xin Lu
Maguire, Grainne S
Dann, Peter
Weston, Michael AORCID iD for Weston, Michael A orcid.org/0000-0002-8717-0410
Journal name Behavioral ecology
Volume number 29
Issue number 4
Start page 933
End page 938
Total pages 6
Publisher Oxford University Press
Place of publication Oxford, Eng.
Publication date 2018-07
ISSN 1045-2249
1465-7279
Keyword(s) ground-nesting
parental care
precocial
radio-tracking
sex-ratio
survival
science & technology
life sciences & biomedicine
behavioral sciences
biology
ecology
zoology
environmental sciences & ecology
Summary Within some socially monogamous species, the relative contribution of care provided by each parent varies substantially, from uniparental to equitable biparental care. The provision of care is influenced by its costs and benefits, which may differ between parents (leading to inter-parental “conflict”) and are expected to change in relation to the needs of young (which vary with age) and potentially to traits such as their sex. If the fitness benefits to parents differ with the sex of offspring, parents may adjust their investment in young of different sexes to optimize their own fitness. We radio-tracked 42 Red-capped Plover Charadrius ruficapillus broods and found that, at least diurnally, females cared for the brood for the first half of brood-rearing, while gradually reducing care. Males contributed little diurnal care early in brood-rearing, then increased care, taking over from females as young approached independence. The sex-ratio of the brood influenced the division of care between parents; male parents attended the brood more when there were greater proportions of female chicks, whereas female parents attended the brood more when there were a greater proportion of male chicks. This is apparently the first recorded case in a precocial bird where each parents’ investment in brood care is influenced by the brood sex-ratio. Our results defy unambiguous explanation.
Language eng
DOI 10.1093/beheco/ary052
Field of Research 050211 Wildlife and Habitat Management
0602 Ecology
0603 Evolutionary Biology
0608 Zoology
Socio Economic Objective 960802 Coastal and Estuarine Flora
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30109623

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 3 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 3 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 126 Abstract Views, 2 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 21 Jun 2018, 17:02:28 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.