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Plyometrics can preserve peak power during 2 months of physical inactivity: an RCT including a one-year follow-up

Kramer, Andreas, Kümmel, Jakob, Gollhofer, Albert, Armbrecht, Gabriele, Ritzmann, Ramona, Belavy, Daniel, Felsenberg, Dieter and Gruber, Markus 2018, Plyometrics can preserve peak power during 2 months of physical inactivity: an RCT including a one-year follow-up, Frontiers in physiology, vol. 9, pp. 1-11, doi: 10.3389/fphys.2018.00633.

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Title Plyometrics can preserve peak power during 2 months of physical inactivity: an RCT including a one-year follow-up
Author(s) Kramer, Andreas
Kümmel, Jakob
Gollhofer, Albert
Armbrecht, Gabriele
Ritzmann, Ramona
Belavy, DanielORCID iD for Belavy, Daniel orcid.org/0000-0002-9307-832X
Felsenberg, Dieter
Gruber, Markus
Journal name Frontiers in physiology
Volume number 9
Article ID 633
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher Frontiers
Place of publication Lausanne, Switzerland
Publication date 2018-05-29
ISSN 1664-042X
Keyword(s) SSC
bed rest
countermeasure
exercise
power
rate of force development
specificity
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Physiology
MUSCLE FUNCTION
RESISTANCE EXERCISE
RESISTIVE EXERCISE
SHORT-DURATION
VERTICAL JUMP
PERFORMANCE
STRENGTH
SIZE
METAANALYSIS
Summary Objective: Inactivity results in a marked loss of muscle function, especially in movements requiring high power, force, and rate of force development. The aim of the present study was to evaluate if jump training can prevent these deteriorating effects of physical inactivity.

Methods: Performance and muscle activity during several types of jumps was assessed directly before and after 60 days of bed rest as well as during follow-up visits in 23 male participants. Participants in the jump training group (JUMP, 12 participants) trained 5-6x per week during the bed rest period in a sledge jump system that allows jumps in a horizontal position, whereas the control group (CTRL, 11 participants) did not train.

Results: Performance and muscle activity considerably decreased after bed rest in the control group but not in the training group, neither for countermovement jumps (peak power CTRL -31%, JUMP +0%, group × time interaction effect p < 0.001), nor for squat jumps (peak power CTRL -35%, JUMP +1%, p < 0.001) and repetitive hops (peak force CTRL -35%, JUMP -2%, p < 0.001; rate of force development CTRL -53%, JUMP +4%, p < 0.001). The control group's performance had returned to baseline 3 months after bed rest.

Conclusion: Despite the short exercise duration, the jump training successfully prevented power and strength losses throughout 2 months of bed rest.Thus, plyometrics can be recommended as an effective and efficient type of exercise for sedentary populations, preventing the deterioration of neuromuscular performance during physical inactivity.
Language eng
DOI 10.3389/fphys.2018.00633
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30109935

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.