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Selenium, selenoproteins and neurodegenerative diseases

Rita Cardoso, Barbara, Roberts, Blaine R., Bush, Ashley I. and Hare, Dominic J. 2015, Selenium, selenoproteins and neurodegenerative diseases, Metallomics, vol. 7, no. 8, pp. 1213-1228, doi: 10.1039/c5mt00075k.

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Title Selenium, selenoproteins and neurodegenerative diseases
Author(s) Rita Cardoso, BarbaraORCID iD for Rita Cardoso, Barbara orcid.org/0000-0002-6393-1377
Roberts, Blaine R.
Bush, Ashley I.
Hare, Dominic J.
Journal name Metallomics
Volume number 7
Issue number 8
Start page 1213
End page 1228
Total pages 16
Publisher Royal Society of Chemistry
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2015-08
ISSN 1756-591X
Keyword(s) Animals
Central Nervous System
Humans
Neurodegenerative Diseases
Selenium
Selenoproteins
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Biochemistry & Molecular Biology
AMYOTROPHIC-LATERAL-SCLEROSIS
SEVERE NEUROLOGICAL DYSFUNCTION
REMITTING MULTIPLE-SCLEROSIS
GLUTATHIONE-PEROXIDASE 4
MILD ALZHEIMERS-DISEASE
THIOREDOXIN-LIKE FAMILY
ROOT GANGLION NEURONS
OXIDATIVE STRESS
PARKINSONS-DISEASE
DIPHENYL DISELENIDE
Summary It is unsurprising that our understanding of the role of selenium in neurological function is somewhat immature, considering its relatively recent discovery as an essential element to human health. Selenocysteine, the 21st amino acid, is the defining feature of the 25 selenoprotein-encoding genes so far discovered within the human genome. The low abundance of these proteins in the brain belies the integral role they play in normal neurological function, from well-characterised antioxidant activity in the periphery to poorly understood mechanisms that modulate mitochondrial function and response to brain pathology. Selenium has been identified as playing a role in several neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, though its function as a ‘cause or effect’ of disease process remains unclear. This review discusses selenium metabolism in detail, specifically with regard to the role it plays within the central nervous system, and examines the most current literature investigating how selenium may be involved in chronic diseases of the central nervous system.
Language eng
DOI 10.1039/c5mt00075k
Field of Research 110399 Clinical Sciences not elsewhere classified
03 Chemical Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30109985

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.