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Differences in infant feeding practices between Chinese-born and Australian-born mothers living in Australia: a cross-sectional study

Bolton, Kristy A, Kremer, Peter, Hesketh, Kylie D, Laws, Rachel, Kuswara, Konsita and Campbell, Karen J 2018, Differences in infant feeding practices between Chinese-born and Australian-born mothers living in Australia: a cross-sectional study, BMC pediatrics, vol. 18, pp. 1-9, doi: 10.1186/s12887-018-1157-0.

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Title Differences in infant feeding practices between Chinese-born and Australian-born mothers living in Australia: a cross-sectional study
Author(s) Bolton, Kristy AORCID iD for Bolton, Kristy A orcid.org/0000-0001-6721-4503
Kremer, PeterORCID iD for Kremer, Peter orcid.org/0000-0003-2476-1958
Hesketh, Kylie D
Laws, RachelORCID iD for Laws, Rachel orcid.org/0000-0003-4328-1116
Kuswara, Konsita
Campbell, Karen JORCID iD for Campbell, Karen J orcid.org/0000-0002-4499-3396
Journal name BMC pediatrics
Volume number 18
Article ID 209
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2018-06-28
ISSN 1471-2431
1471-2431
Keyword(s) early childhood
breastfeeding
ethnicity
immigrants
culture
overweight
obesity
maternal child health
science & technology
life sciences & biomedicine
pediatrics
Summary BACKGROUND: Chinese immigrants are the third largest immigrant group in Australia. Recent qualitative evidence from Victorian Maternal and Child Health nurses indicate that infants of Chinese parents commonly have rapid growth trajectories and that high value is placed on rapid growth and having a fatter child; with low breastfeeding rates and overfeeding of infant formula. The aim of this study was to compare infant feeding practices (breastfeeding, infant formula, other liquids, solids) of Chinese-born and Australian-born mothers living in Australia.

METHODS: Using the Australian National Infant Feeding Survey dataset (2010-2011), infant feeding data from Chinese-born mothers (n = 602) were compared with a random sub-sample of Australian-born mothers (n = 602). Group differences on feeding practices were tested using Chi-square or t-tests and the effect of ethnicity on infant feeding behaviours assessed using regression.

RESULTS: Compared to infants of Australian-born mothers, infants of Chinese-born mothers were younger when they first consumed infant formula, water-based drinks and fruit juice and older when they first ate solid foods (p < 0.05). Furthermore, infants of Chinese-born mothers were less likely to have ever had cow's milk (OR: 0.37 95%CI:, 0.18-0.78) and solids (0.41, 0.25-0.68); but were more likely to have ever had infant formula (2.19, 1.32-3.62), water (2.45, 1.55-3.87), toddler milk (3.39, 1.60-7.18), water-based drinks (e.g. cordial, soft drink, tea; 2.48, 1.12-5.49), and fruit juice (4.03, 2.50-6.51). Those ≤4 months of age were more likely to have had water-based drinks (7.77, 1.96-30.77) and fruit juice (3.44, 1.14-10.38) (p < 0.05) compared to infants of Australian-born mothers.

CONCLUSION: Differences in mothers' early infant feeding practices exist between Chinese-born and Australian-born mothers living in Australia. Better understanding these ethnically patterned infant feeding practices is important for identifying key opportunities to promote best nutrition and growth in early life in different ethnic groups within our population.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12887-018-1157-0
Field of Research 1114 Paediatrics And Reproductive Medicine
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30110045

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.