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Diet-induced weight loss has no effect on psychological stress in overweight and obese adults: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

Booth, Alison O, Wang, Xiaodan, Turner, Anne I, Nowson, Caryl A and Torres, Susan J 2018, Diet-induced weight loss has no effect on psychological stress in overweight and obese adults: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials, Nutrients, vol. 10, no. 5, pp. 1-12, doi: 10.3390/nu10050613.

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Title Diet-induced weight loss has no effect on psychological stress in overweight and obese adults: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials
Author(s) Booth, Alison OORCID iD for Booth, Alison O orcid.org/0000-0003-4914-7006
Wang, Xiaodan
Turner, Anne IORCID iD for Turner, Anne I orcid.org/0000-0002-0682-2860
Nowson, Caryl AORCID iD for Nowson, Caryl A orcid.org/0000-0001-6586-7965
Torres, Susan JORCID iD for Torres, Susan J orcid.org/0000-0002-2599-1934
Journal name Nutrients
Volume number 10
Issue number 5
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2018-05-14
ISSN 2072-6643
Keyword(s) diet
weight loss
obesity
stress
adults
meta-analysis
science & technology
life sciences & biomedicine
nutrition & dietetics
Summary The effect of weight loss on psychological stress is unknown. The study aimed to investigate the effect of diet-induced weight loss in overweight and obese adults on psychological measures of stress through a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Databases including Medline Complete, Embase and PsycINFO were searched up to February 2018 for diet-induced weight loss RCTs, which included self-reported assessment of psychological stress. The mean difference between the intervention and control group of changes in stress (intervention-baseline) was used. Ten RCTs were included with 615 participants (502 women, age range 20⁻80 years). Overall, there was no change in stress (mean difference -0.06, 95% CI: -0.17, 0.06, p = 0.33) and no change in the five studies with a significant reduction in weight in the intervention group compared to a control group that lost no weight (mean difference in weight -3.9 Kg, 95% CI: -5.51, -2.29, p < 0.0001; mean difference in stress 0.04, 95% CI: -0.17, 0.25, p = 0.71). For all analyses, there was low heterogeneity. The benefits of weight loss for those who are overweight and obese do not appear to either increase or reduce psychological stress at the end of the weight loss period.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/nu10050613
Field of Research 1111 Nutrition And Dietetics
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, the authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30110070

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.