Openly accessible

Protocol for a pragmatic randomised controlled trial of Body Brain Life-General Practice and a Lifestyle Modification Programme to decrease dementia risk exposure in a primary care setting

Kim, Sarang, McMaster, Mitchell, Torres, Susan, Cox, Kay L., Lautenschlager, Nicola, Rebok, George W., Pond, Dimity, D'Este, Catherine, McRae, Ian, Cherbuin, Nicholas and Anstey, Kaarin J. 2018, Protocol for a pragmatic randomised controlled trial of Body Brain Life-General Practice and a Lifestyle Modification Programme to decrease dementia risk exposure in a primary care setting, BMJ Open, vol. 8, no. 3, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-019329.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
torres-protocolfora-2018.pdf Published version application/pdf 426.19KB 113

Title Protocol for a pragmatic randomised controlled trial of Body Brain Life-General Practice and a Lifestyle Modification Programme to decrease dementia risk exposure in a primary care setting
Author(s) Kim, Sarang
McMaster, Mitchell
Torres, SusanORCID iD for Torres, Susan orcid.org/0000-0002-2599-1934
Cox, Kay L.
Lautenschlager, Nicola
Rebok, George W.
Pond, Dimity
D'Este, Catherine
McRae, Ian
Cherbuin, Nicholas
Anstey, Kaarin J.
Journal name BMJ Open
Volume number 8
Issue number 3
Article ID e019329
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher BMJ Open
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2018-03
ISSN 2044-6055
Keyword(s) australia
dementia
general practice
lifestyle change
online
rct
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Medicine, General & Internal
General & Internal Medicine
SLEEP QUALITY INDEX
FORM HEALTH SURVEY
PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY
ALZHEIMERS-DISEASE
COGNITIVE FUNCTION
CONSORT STATEMENT
OLDER-ADULTS
VALIDITY
INTERVENTION
RELIABILITY
Summary INTRODUCTION: It has been estimated that a 10%-25% reduction in seven key risk factors could potentially prevent 1.1-3.0 million Alzheimer's disease cases globally. In addition, as dementia is preceded by more subtle cognitive deficits which have substantial social and economic impact, effective preventative interventions would likely have more extensive benefits. The current study evaluates in primary care a multidomain risk-reduction intervention targeting adults with high risk of developing dementia.

METHODS AND ANALYSIS: A randomised controlled trial (RCT) is being conducted to evaluate three intervention programmes using a pragmatic approach suitable to the clinic: (1) a 12-week online and face-to-face dementia risk-reduction intervention (Body Brain Life-General Practice (BBL-GP)); (2) a 6-week face-to-face group lifestyle modification programme (LMP); and (3) a 12-week email-only programme providing general health information. We aim to recruit 240 participants, aged 18 and over, to undergo a comprehensive cognitive and physical assessment at baseline and follow-ups (postintervention, 18, 36 and 62 weeks). The primary outcome is dementia risk measured with the modified version of the Australian National University-Alzheimer's Disease Risk Index Short Form. Secondary outcomes are cognitive function measured with Trails A and B, and the Digit Symbol Modalities Test; physical activity with moderate-vigorous physical activity and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire; depression with the Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression; cost evaluation with the 12-item Short Form Health Survey, Framingham Coronary Heart Disease Risk Score and Australian Type 2 Diabetes Risk Assessment Tool; diet quality with the Australian Recommended Food Score; and sleep quality with the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index.

ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This RCT is a novel pragmatic intervention applied in a primary care setting to reduce the dementia risk exposure in adults at high risk. If successful, BBL-GP and LMP will provide a versatile, evidence-based package that can be easily and quickly rolled out to other primary care settings and which can be scaled up at relatively low cost compared with other strategies involving intensive interventions. 
Language eng
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-019329
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution non-commercial licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30110071

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 8 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 6 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 315 Abstract Views, 115 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 09 Jul 2018, 08:12:37 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.