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Increased severity and spread of Mycobacterium ulcerans, Southeastern Australia

Tai, Alex Y.C., Athan, Eugene, Friedman, N. Deborah, Hughes, Andrew, Walton, Aaron and O'Brien, Daniel P. 2018, Increased severity and spread of Mycobacterium ulcerans, Southeastern Australia, Emerging infectious diseases, vol. 24, no. 1, pp. 58-64, doi: 10.3201/eid2401.171070.

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Title Increased severity and spread of Mycobacterium ulcerans, Southeastern Australia
Formatted title Increased severity and spread of Mycobacterium ulcerans, Southeastern Australia
Author(s) Tai, Alex Y.C.
Athan, EugeneORCID iD for Athan, Eugene orcid.org/0000-0001-9838-6471
Friedman, N. Deborah
Hughes, Andrew
Walton, Aaron
O'Brien, Daniel P.
Journal name Emerging infectious diseases
Volume number 24
Issue number 1
Start page 58
End page 64
Total pages 7
Publisher Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Place of publication Atlanta, Ga.
Publication date 2018-01
ISSN 1080-6040
1080-6059
Keyword(s) Australia
Buruli ulcer
Mycobacteria ulcerans
Mycobacteria ulcerans disease
bacteria
severe disease
severity
spread
tuberculosis and other mycobacteria
zoonoses
Adult
Aged
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mycobacterium ulcerans
Severity of Illness Index
Victoria
Summary Reported cases of Mycobacterium ulcerans disease (Buruli ulcer) have been increasing in southeastern Australia and spreading into new geographic areas. We analyzed 426 cases of M. ulcerans disease during January 1998–May 2017 in the established disease-endemic region of the Bellarine Peninsula and the emerging endemic region of the Mornington Peninsula. A total of 20.4% of cases patients had severe disease. Over time, there has been an increase in the number of cases managed per year and the proportion associated with severe disease. Risk factors associated with severe disease included age, time period (range of years of diagnosis), and location of lesions over a joint. We highlight the changing epidemiology and pathogenicity of M. ulcerans disease in Australia. Further research, including genomic studies of emergent strains with increased pathogenicity, is urgently needed to improve the understanding of this disease to facilitate implementation of effective public health measures to halt its spread.
Language eng
DOI 10.3201/eid2401.171070
Field of Research 1108 Medical Microbiology
1117 Public Health And Health Services
1103 Clinical Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ┬ęThis work is in the Public Domain and has no copyright restriction
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Public Domain Mark
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30110108

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.