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Food-based social enterprises and asylum seekers: the food justice truck

Mckay, Fiona H, Lippi, Kehla, Dunn, Matthew, Haines, Bronte C and Lindberg, Rebecca 2018, Food-based social enterprises and asylum seekers: the food justice truck, Nutrients, vol. 10, no. 6, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.3390/nu10060756.

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Title Food-based social enterprises and asylum seekers: the food justice truck
Author(s) Mckay, Fiona HORCID iD for Mckay, Fiona H orcid.org/0000-0002-0498-3572
Lippi, KehlaORCID iD for Lippi, Kehla orcid.org/0000-0002-3283-4363
Dunn, MatthewORCID iD for Dunn, Matthew orcid.org/0000-0003-4615-5078
Haines, Bronte C
Lindberg, Rebecca
Journal name Nutrients
Volume number 10
Issue number 6
Article ID 756
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2018-06-12
ISSN 2072-6643
Keyword(s) food security
social enterprise
asylum seeker
food aid
case study
science & technology
life sciences & biomedicine
nutrition & dietetics
Summary People seeking asylum in high-income countries are vulnerable to food insecurity due to limited opportunities for social and economic participation. While charity organizations have long sought to provide food aid to those in need, the increasing number of people seeking this assistance requires alternatives. Using a case study approach, this research investigates The Food Justice Truck, which is a social enterprise designed to provide low cost, nutritious food to people seeking asylum with an aim to reduce the food insecurity burden. Twenty-seven people seeking asylum completed a structured interview (n = 15) or a semi-structured interview (n = 12). The majority of participants were female (n = 20) with an average age of 38.3 years (Standard Deviation (SD) 7.3; range 30⁻59) and over half were from Iran (n = 16, 59.2%) with most holding a temporary visa to stay in Australia (n = 15, 55.5%). Two key findings were identified including the fact that the FJT is at risk of creating and perpetuating a power imbalance. However, as a social setting, the FJT has the potential to promote and enable a social connection and create a positive experience. This research study adds valuable information to the literature by providing research on one alternative to traditional food aid. It was found that alternatives to traditional food aid may play a role in reducing the food security burden.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/nu10060756
Field of Research 1111 Nutrition And Dietetics
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, the authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30110155

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.