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Physical activity-equivalent label reduces consumption of discretionary snack foods

Hartley, Isabella E., Keast, Russell and Liem, Djin 2018, Physical activity-equivalent label reduces consumption of discretionary snack foods, Public health nutrition, vol. 21, no. 8, pp. 1435-1443, doi: 10.1017/S1368980018000228.

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Title Physical activity-equivalent label reduces consumption of discretionary snack foods
Author(s) Hartley, Isabella E.
Keast, RussellORCID iD for Keast, Russell orcid.org/0000-0003-2147-7687
Liem, DjinORCID iD for Liem, Djin orcid.org/0000-0002-6619-6101
Journal name Public health nutrition
Volume number 21
Issue number 8
Start page 1435
End page 1443
Total pages 9
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, Eng.
Publication date 2018-06
ISSN 1368-9800
1475-2727
Keyword(s) Discretionary food
Energy intake
Food labelling
Physical activity
Snack consumption
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Nutrition & Dietetics
BEVERAGE CHOICES
ENERGY-BALANCE
MENU LABELS
OBESITY
INFORMATION
CALORIE
FRONT
METAANALYSIS
ADOLESCENTS
PERCEPTION
Summary Objective
The present research aimed to investigate the impact of the physical activity calorie equivalent (PACE) front-of-pack label on consumption, prospective consumption and liking of familiar and unfamiliar discretionary snack foods.

Design
In a within-subject randomised design, participants tasted and rated liking (9-point hedonic scale) and prospective consumption (9-point category scale) of four different snack foods with four different labels (i.e. blank, fake, PACE, PACE doubled) and four control snack foods. The twenty snack foods were presented during two 45 min sessions (i.e. ten snack foods per session) which were separated by one week. The amount participants sampled of each snack food was measured.

Setting
The study was conducted in the Centre for Advanced Sensory Sciences laboratory at Deakin University, Australia.

Subjects
The participants were 153 university students (126 females, twenty-seven males, mean age 24·3 (sd 4·9) years) currently enrolled in an undergraduate nutrition degree at Deakin University.

Results
When the PACE label was present on familiar snack foods, participants sampled 9·9 % (22·8 (sem 1·4) v. 25·3 (sem 1·5) g, P=0·03) less than when such label was not present. This was in line with a decreased prospective snack food consumption of 9·1 % (3·0 (sem 0·2) v. 3·3 (sem 0·2) servings, P=0·03). Such pattern was not seen in unfamiliar snacks.

Conclusions
The PACE label appears to be a promising way to decrease familiar discretionary snack food consumption in young, health-minded participants.
Language eng
DOI 10.1017/S1368980018000228
Field of Research 11 Medical And Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30110177

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.