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The perceived feasibility and acceptability of a conceptually challenging exercise training program in older adults

Miller, Clint, Teychenne, Megan and Maple, Jaimie-Lee 2018, The perceived feasibility and acceptability of a conceptually challenging exercise training program in older adults, Clinical interventions in aging, vol. 13, pp. 451-461, doi: 10.2147/CIA.S154664.

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Title The perceived feasibility and acceptability of a conceptually challenging exercise training program in older adults
Author(s) Miller, ClintORCID iD for Miller, Clint orcid.org/0000-0001-7743-6986
Teychenne, MeganORCID iD for Teychenne, Megan orcid.org/0000-0002-7293-8255
Maple, Jaimie-Lee
Journal name Clinical interventions in aging
Volume number 13
Start page 451
End page 461
Total pages 11
Publisher Dove Medical Press
Place of publication Macclesfield, Eng.
Publication date 2018
ISSN 1176-9092
1178-1998
Keyword(s) balance
exercise
falls
over-speed training
physical activity
power training
qualitative analysis
thematic analysis
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Geriatrics & Gerontology
exercise/physical activity
ENERGY-COST
MUSCLE POWER
QUALITATIVE RESEARCH
ELDERLY PERSONS
RISK-FACTORS
BODY-WEIGHT
WALKING
PEOPLE
STRENGTH
Summary Background: Exercise training is an essential component of falls prevention strategies, but they do not fully address components of physical function that leads to falls. The training approaches to achieve this may not be perceived as appropriate or even feasible in older adults. This study aims to assess the perceived feasibility and acceptability of novel exercise training approaches not usually prescribed to older adults.

Patients and methods: Fourteen adults were exposed to conceptually and physically demanding exercises. Interviews were then conducted to determine perceptions and acceptability of individual exercise tasks. Qualitative thematic analysis was used to identify themes.

Results: Safety and confidence, acceptability, and population participation were the key themes identified. Staff knowledge, presence, program design, and overt safety equipment were important for alleviating initial apprehension. Although physically demanding, participants expressed satisfaction when challenged. Prior disposition, understanding the value, and the appeal of novel exercises were perceived to influence program engagement.

Conclusion: Given the evidence for acceptability, this type of training is feasible and may be appropriate as part of an exercise training program for older adults. Further research should be conducted to confirm that the physical adaptations to exercise training approaches as presented in this study occur in a similar manner to that observed in younger adults, and to also determine whether these adaptations lead to prolonged independence and reduced falls in older adults compared to usual care.
Language eng
DOI 10.2147/CIA.S154664
Field of Research 1103 Clinical Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, Miller et al.
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution non-commercial licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30110194

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.