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From problem people to addictive products: a qualitative study on rethinking gambling policy from the perspective of lived experience

Miller, Helen E, Thomas, Samantha L and Robinson, Priscilla 2018, From problem people to addictive products: a qualitative study on rethinking gambling policy from the perspective of lived experience, Harm reduction journal, vol. 15, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.1186/s12954-018-0220-3.

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Title From problem people to addictive products: a qualitative study on rethinking gambling policy from the perspective of lived experience
Author(s) Miller, Helen E
Thomas, Samantha LORCID iD for Thomas, Samantha L orcid.org/0000-0003-1427-7775
Robinson, Priscilla
Journal name Harm reduction journal
Volume number 15
Article ID 16
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2018-04-06
ISSN 1477-7517
Keyword(s) gambling
harm
stigma
policy
discourses
sersonal responsibility
science & technology
life sciences & biomedicine
substance abuse
Summary BACKGROUND: Previous research has shown that government and industry discussions of gambling may focus on personal responsibility for gambling harm. In Australia, these discussions have largely excluded people with lived experience of problem gambling, including those involved in peer support and advocacy.

METHODS: We conducted 26 in-depth interviews with people with current or previous problem gambling on electronic gaming machines (EGMs) involved in peer support and advocacy activities, using an approach informed by Interpretive Policy Analysis and Constructivist Grounded Theory.

RESULTS: Participants perceived that government and industry discussed gambling as safe and entertaining with a focus on personal responsibility for problem gambling. This focus on personal responsibility was perceived to increase stigma associated with problem gambling. In contrast, they described gambling as risky, addictive and harmful, with problem gambling resulting from the design of EGMs. As a result of their different perspectives, participants proposed different interventions to reduce gambling harm, including reducing accessibility and making products safer.

CONCLUSIONS: Challenging the discourses used by governments and industry to describe gambling, using the lived experience of people with experience of gambling harm, may result in reduced stigma associated with problem gambling, and more effective public policy approaches to reducing harm.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12954-018-0220-3
Field of Research 1117 Public Health And Health Services
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30110195

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Health and Social Development
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.