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Knowledge and attitudes are related to selected salt-specific behaviours among Australian parents

Khokhar, Durreajam, Nowson, Caryl Anne, Margerison, Claire, Bolam, Bruce and Grimes, Carley Ann 2018, Knowledge and attitudes are related to selected salt-specific behaviours among Australian parents, Nutrients, vol. 10, no. 6, pp. 1-17, doi: 10.3390/nu10060720.

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Title Knowledge and attitudes are related to selected salt-specific behaviours among Australian parents
Author(s) Khokhar, Durreajam
Nowson, Caryl AnneORCID iD for Nowson, Caryl Anne orcid.org/0000-0001-6586-7965
Margerison, ClaireORCID iD for Margerison, Claire orcid.org/0000-0002-2722-6128
Bolam, Bruce
Grimes, Carley AnnORCID iD for Grimes, Carley Ann orcid.org/0000-0002-9123-1888
Journal name Nutrients
Volume number 10
Issue number 6
Article ID 720
Start page 1
End page 17
Total pages 17
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2018-06-04
ISSN 2072-6643
Keyword(s) salt
knowledge
attitude
behaviour
parent
Australia
science & technology
life sciences & biomedicine
nutrition & dietetics
Summary Salt intake in adults and children exceeds recommended levels. Salt-related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviours (KABs) may influence the amount of salt consumed. The aims of this study were to assess salt-related KABs among parents, and investigate whether salt-related knowledge and attitudes are associated with salt-specific behaviours. Parents with children <18 years were recruited from four shopping centers across Victoria, Australia; Facebook; and an online consumer research panel; they then completed an online questionnaire assessing salt-related KABs and salt use in children. Eight hundred and thirty-seven parents (mean age 41.0 (10.0) (SD) years) provided valid responses. Most (77%) parents were aware that eating too much salt damages children’s health and that reducing the amount of salt in their children’s diet was important (70%), and 46% reported adding salt to food prepared for their children. Parents who were aware that eating too much salt damages children’s health were less likely to report that their child added salt at the table (OR = 0.51, p < 0.001), and that they added salt to food prepared for the child (OR = 0.46, p < 0.001). Educational messages that highlight the adverse health effects of salt during childhood are likely to be useful in reducing discretionary salt use in the home environment.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/nu10060720
Field of Research 1111 Nutrition And Dietetics
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, the authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30110313

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.