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A nutrition strategy to reduce the burden of diet related disease: access to dietician services must complement population health approaches

Segal, Leonie and Opie, Rachelle S 2015, A nutrition strategy to reduce the burden of diet related disease: access to dietician services must complement population health approaches, Frontiers in pharmacology, vol. 6, pp. 1-7, doi: 10.3389/fphar.2015.00160.

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Title A nutrition strategy to reduce the burden of diet related disease: access to dietician services must complement population health approaches
Author(s) Segal, Leonie
Opie, Rachelle SORCID iD for Opie, Rachelle S orcid.org/0000-0002-3816-0670
Journal name Frontiers in pharmacology
Volume number 6
Article ID 160
Start page 1
End page 7
Total pages 7
Publisher Frontiers Media
Place of publication Lausanne, Switzerland
Publication date 2015-08-11
ISSN 1663-9812
Keyword(s) nutrition strategy
dietician services
diet quality
population health
Summary Poor diet quality is implicated in almost every disease and health issue. And yet, in most advanced market economies diet quality is poor, with a minority meeting guidelines for healthy eating. Poor diet is thus responsible for substantial disease burden. Societies have at their disposal a range of strategies to influence diet behaviors. These can be classified into: (i) population level socio-educational approaches to enhance diet knowledge; (ii) pricing incentives (subsidies on healthy foods, punitive taxes on unhealthy foods); (iii) regulations to modify the food environment, and (iv) the provision of clinical dietetic services. There is little evidence that societies are active in implementing the available strategies. Advertising of “junk foods” is largely unchecked, contrasting with strict controls on advertising tobacco products, which also attract punitive taxes. Access to dieticians is restricted in most countries, even in the context of universal health care. In Australia in 2011 there were just 2,969 practicing dieticians/nutritionists or 1.3 clinicians per 10,000 persons, compared with 5.8 physiotherapists per 10,000 persons, 14.8 general practitioners (family physicians) per 10,000 persons or 75 nurses per 10,000 persons. It is time to implement comprehensive national nutrition strategies capable of effecting change. Such strategies need to be multi-component, incorporating both public health approaches and expanded publicly funded dietetic services. Access to individualized dietetic services is needed by those at risk, or with current chronic conditions, given the complexity of the diet message, the need for professional support for behavior change and to reflect individual circumstances. The adoption of a comprehensive nutrition strategy offers the promise of substantial improvement in diet quality, better health and wellbeing and lower health care costs.
Language eng
DOI 10.3389/fphar.2015.00160
Field of Research 1115 Pharmacology And Pharmaceutical Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2015, Segal and Opie
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30110423

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.