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The potential cost-effectiveness and equity impacts of restricting television advertising of unhealthy food and beverages to Australian children

Brown, Victoria, Ananthapavan, Jaithri, Veerman, Lennert, Sacks, Gary, Lal, Anita, Peeters, Anna, Backholer, Kathryn and Moodie, Marjory 2018, The potential cost-effectiveness and equity impacts of restricting television advertising of unhealthy food and beverages to Australian children, Nutrients, vol. 10, no. 5, pp. 1-14, doi: 10.3390/nu10050622.

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Title The potential cost-effectiveness and equity impacts of restricting television advertising of unhealthy food and beverages to Australian children
Author(s) Brown, VictoriaORCID iD for Brown, Victoria orcid.org/0000-0003-2891-9476
Ananthapavan, JaithriORCID iD for Ananthapavan, Jaithri orcid.org/0000-0002-5957-6931
Veerman, Lennert
Sacks, GaryORCID iD for Sacks, Gary orcid.org/0000-0001-9736-1539
Lal, Anita
Peeters, AnnaORCID iD for Peeters, Anna orcid.org/0000-0003-4340-9132
Backholer, KathrynORCID iD for Backholer, Kathryn orcid.org/0000-0002-3323-575X
Moodie, MarjoryORCID iD for Moodie, Marjory orcid.org/0000-0001-6890-5250
Journal name Nutrients
Volume number 10
Issue number 5
Article ID 622
Start page 1
End page 14
Total pages 14
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2018-05-15
ISSN 2072-6643
Keyword(s) economic evaluation
cost-effectiveness
obesity
pediatric
science & technology
life sciences & biomedicine
nutrition & dietetics
Summary Television (TV) advertising of food and beverages high in fat, sugar and salt (HFSS) influences food preferences and consumption. Children from lower socioeconomic position (SEP) have higher exposure to TV advertising due to more time spent watching TV. This paper sought to estimate the cost-effectiveness of legislation to restrict HFSS TV advertising until 9:30 pm, and to examine how health benefits and healthcare cost-savings differ by SEP. Cost-effectiveness modelling was undertaken (i) at the population level, and (ii) by area-level SEP. A multi-state multiple-cohort lifetable model was used to estimate obesity-related health outcomes and healthcare cost-savings over the lifetime of the 2010 Australian population. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were reported, with assumptions tested through sensitivity analyses. An intervention restricting HFSS TV advertising would cost AUD5.9M (95% UI AUD5.8M⁻AUD7M), resulting in modelled reductions in energy intake (mean 115 kJ/day) and body mass index (BMI) (mean 0.352 kg/m²). The intervention is likely to be cost-saving, with 1.4 times higher total cost-savings and 1.5 times higher health benefits in the most disadvantaged socioeconomic group (17,512 HALYs saved (95% UI 10,372⁻25,155); total cost-savings AUD126.3M (95% UI AUD58.7M⁻196.9M) over the lifetime) compared to the least disadvantaged socioeconomic group (11,321 HALYs saved (95% UI 6812⁻15,679); total cost-savings AUD90.9M (95% UI AUD44.3M⁻136.3M)). Legislation to restrict HFSS TV advertising is likely to be cost-effective, with greater health benefits and healthcare cost-savings for children with low SEP.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/nu10050622
Field of Research 1111 Nutrition And Dietetics
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, the authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30110444

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Health and Social Development
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.