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Biological and psychosocial processes in the development of children's appetitive traits: insights from developmental theory and research

Russell, Catherine G. and Russell, Alan 2018, Biological and psychosocial processes in the development of children's appetitive traits: insights from developmental theory and research, Nutrients, vol. 10, no. 6, pp. 1-25, doi: 10.3390/nu10060692.

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Title Biological and psychosocial processes in the development of children's appetitive traits: insights from developmental theory and research
Author(s) Russell, Catherine G.
Russell, Alan
Journal name Nutrients
Volume number 10
Issue number 6
Article ID 692
Start page 1
End page 25
Total pages 25
Publisher M D P I
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2018-05-29
ISSN 2072-6643
Keyword(s) psychosocial processes
bidirectional processes
transactional processes
child
parenting
temperament
biological factors
appetitive traits
food neophobia
pediatric obesity
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Nutrition & Dietetics
parental feeding practices
eating behavior questionnaire
emotion-related regulation
gemini birth cohort
body mass index
self-regulation
early childhood
effortful control
environmental influences
Summary There has been increasing concern expressed about children's food intakes and dietary patterns. These are closely linked to children's appetitive traits (such as disinhibited eating and food fussiness/neophobia). Research has examined both biological and psychosocial correlates or predictors of these traits. There has been less focus on possible processes or mechanisms associated with children's development of these traits and research that links biological and psychosocial factors. There is an absence of research that links biological and psychosocial factors. In the present article, we outline a model intended to facilitate theory and research on the development of appetitive traits. It is based on scholarship from developmental theory and research and incorporates biological factors such as genetic predispositions and temperament as well as psychosocial factors in terms of parent cognitions, feeding styles and feeding practices. Particular attention is directed to aspects such as emotional eating and feeding, self-regulation of energy intake, and non-shared family environments. We highlight the opportunity for longitudinal research that examines bidirectional, transactional and cascade processes and uses a developmental framework. The model provides a basis for connecting the biological foundations of appetitive traits to system-level analysis in the family. Knowledge generated through the application of the model should lead to more effective prevention and intervention initiatives.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/nu10060692
Field of Research 1111 Nutrition And Dietetics
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30110457

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.