Openly accessible

Key lessons and impact of the growing healthy mHealth program on milk feeding, timing of introduction of solids, and infant growth: quasi-experimental study

Laws, Rachel A., Denney-Wilson, Elizabeth A., Taki, Sarah, Russell, Catherine G., Zheng, Miaobing, Litterbach, Eloise-Kate, Ong, Kok-Leong, Lymer, Sharyn J., Elliott, Rosalind and Campbell, Karen J. 2018, Key lessons and impact of the growing healthy mHealth program on milk feeding, timing of introduction of solids, and infant growth: quasi-experimental study, JMIR mHealth and uHealth, vol. 6, no. 4, pp. 1-17, doi: 10.2196/mhealth.9040.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
laws-keylessonsand-2018.pdf Published version application/pdf 716.44KB 25

Title Key lessons and impact of the growing healthy mHealth program on milk feeding, timing of introduction of solids, and infant growth: quasi-experimental study
Author(s) Laws, Rachel A.ORCID iD for Laws, Rachel A. orcid.org/0000-0003-4328-1116
Denney-Wilson, Elizabeth A.
Taki, Sarah
Russell, Catherine G.ORCID iD for Russell, Catherine G. orcid.org/0000-0002-0848-2724
Zheng, MiaobingORCID iD for Zheng, Miaobing orcid.org/0000-0002-4151-3502
Litterbach, Eloise-Kate
Ong, Kok-Leong
Lymer, Sharyn J.
Elliott, Rosalind
Campbell, Karen J.ORCID iD for Campbell, Karen J. orcid.org/0000-0002-4499-3396
Journal name JMIR mHealth and uHealth
Volume number 6
Issue number 4
Article ID e78
Start page 1
End page 17
Total pages 17
Publisher JMIR Publications
Place of publication Toronto, Ont.
Publication date 2018-04-19
ISSN 2291-5222
Keyword(s) breastfeeding
complementary feeding
formula feeding
infancy
mHealth
obesity prevention
parents
Summary BACKGROUND: The first year of life is an important window to initiate healthy infant feeding practices to promote healthy growth. Interventions delivered by mobile phone (mHealth) provide a novel approach for reaching parents; however, little is known about the effectiveness of mHealth for child obesity prevention.

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility and effectiveness of an mHealth obesity prevention intervention in terms of reach, acceptability, and impact on key infant feeding outcomes.

METHODS: A quasi-experimental study was conducted with an mHealth intervention group (Growing healthy) and a nonrandomized comparison group (Baby's First Food). The intervention group received access to a free app and website containing information on infant feeding, sleep and settling, and general support for parents with infants aged 0 to 9 months. App-generated notifications directed parents to age-and feeding-specific content within the app. Both groups completed Web-based surveys when infants were less than 3 months old (T1), at 6 months of age (T2), and 9 months of age (T3). Survival analysis was used to examine the duration of any breastfeeding and formula introduction, and cox proportional hazard regression was performed to examine the hazard ratio for ceasing breast feeding between the two groups. Multivariate logistic regression with adjustment for a range of child and parental factors was used to compare the exclusive breastfeeding, formula feeding behaviors, and timing of solid introduction between the 2 groups. Mixed effect polynomial regression models were performed to examine the group differences in growth trajectory from birth to T3.

RESULTS: A total of 909 parents initiated the enrollment process, and a final sample of 645 parents (Growing healthy=301, Baby's First Food=344) met the eligibility criteria. Most mothers were Australian born and just under half had completed a university education. Retention of participants was high (80.3%, 518/645) in both groups. Most parents (226/260, 86.9%) downloaded and used the app; however, usage declined over time. There was a high level of satisfaction with the program, with 86.1% (143/166) reporting that they trusted the information in the app and 84.6% (170/201) claiming that they would recommend it to a friend. However, some technical problems were encountered with just over a quarter of parents reporting that the app failed to work at times. There were no significant differences between groups in any of the target behaviors. Growth trajectories also did not differ between the 2 groups.

CONCLUSIONS: An mHealth intervention using a smartphone app to promote healthy infant feeding behaviors is a feasible and acceptable mode for delivering obesity prevention intervention to parents; however, app usage declined over time. Learnings from this study will be used to further enhance the program so as to improve its potential for changing infant feeding behaviors.
Language eng
DOI 10.2196/mhealth.9040
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30110461

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 1 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 158 Abstract Views, 25 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 09 Jul 2018, 15:00:51 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.