Openly accessible

Measuring and stimulating progress on implementing widely recommended food environment policies: the New Zealand case study

Vandevijvere, Stefanie, Mackay, Sally and Swinburn, Boyd 2018, Measuring and stimulating progress on implementing widely recommended food environment policies: the New Zealand case study, Health research policy and systems, vol. 16, pp. 1-9, doi: 10.1186/s12961-018-0278-0.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
swinburn-measuringand-2018.pdf Published version application/pdf 2.56MB 1

Title Measuring and stimulating progress on implementing widely recommended food environment policies: the New Zealand case study
Author(s) Vandevijvere, Stefanie
Mackay, Sally
Swinburn, Boyd
Journal name Health research policy and systems
Volume number 16
Article ID 3
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2018-01-25
ISSN 1478-4505
Keyword(s) food environments
policy implementation
accountability
INFORMAS
Summary Background: Monitoring the degree of implementation of widely recommended food environment policies by national governments is an important part of stimulating progress towards better population nutritional health.

Methods:
The Healthy Food Environment Policy Index (Food-EPI) was applied for the second time in New Zealand in 2017 (initially applied in 2014) to measure progress on implementation of widely recommended food environment policies. A national panel of 71 independent (n = 48) and government (n = 23) public health experts rated the extent of implementation of 47 policy and infrastructure support good practice indicators by the Government against international best practice, using an extensive evidence document verified by government officials. Experts proposed and prioritised concrete actions needed to address the critical implementation gaps identified.

Results:
Inter-rater reliability was good (Gwet's AC2 > 0.8). Approximately half (47%) of the indicators were rated as having 'low' or 'very little, if any' implementation compared to international benchmarks, a decrease since 2014 (60%). A lower proportion of infrastructure support (29%) compared to policy (70%) indicators were rated as having 'low' or 'very little, if any' implementation. The experts recommended 53 actions, prioritising nine for immediate implementation; three of those prioritised actions were the same as in 2014. The vast majority of experts agreed that the Food-EPI is likely to contribute to beneficial policy change and increased their knowledge about food environments and policies.

Conclusion: The Food-EPI has the potential to increase accountability of governments to implement widely recommended food environment policies and reduce the burden of obesity and diet-related diseases.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12961-018-0278-0
Field of Research 1605 Policy And Administration
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30110488

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Health and Social Development
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 15 Abstract Views, 1 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 09 Jul 2018, 15:18:00 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.