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Sedentary behaviour and hair cortisol amongst women living in socioeconomically disadvantaged neighbourhoods: a cross-sectional study

Teychenne, Megan, Olstad, Dana Lee, Turner, Anne I., Costigan, Sarah A. and Ball, Kylie 2018, Sedentary behaviour and hair cortisol amongst women living in socioeconomically disadvantaged neighbourhoods: a cross-sectional study, International journal of environmental research and public health, vol. 15, no. 4, pp. 1-8, doi: 10.3390/ijerph15040586.

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Title Sedentary behaviour and hair cortisol amongst women living in socioeconomically disadvantaged neighbourhoods: a cross-sectional study
Author(s) Teychenne, MeganORCID iD for Teychenne, Megan orcid.org/0000-0002-7293-8255
Olstad, Dana Lee
Turner, Anne I.ORCID iD for Turner, Anne I. orcid.org/0000-0002-0682-2860
Costigan, Sarah A.ORCID iD for Costigan, Sarah A. orcid.org/0000-0003-2566-3276
Ball, KylieORCID iD for Ball, Kylie orcid.org/0000-0003-2893-8415
Journal name International journal of environmental research and public health
Volume number 15
Issue number 4
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2018-03-25
ISSN 1660-4601
Keyword(s) psychological stress
screen-time
sitting
socioeconomic disadvantage
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Environmental Sciences
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
LONG-TERM CORTISOL
PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY
CHRONIC STRESS
PERCEIVED STRESS
ASSOCIATIONS
DEPRESSION
HEALTH
METAANALYSIS
RELIABILITY
SYMPTOMS
Summary Women living in socioeconomically disadvantaged neighbourhoods are at heightened risk of experiencing psychological stress. Therefore, identifying potential risk factors for stress is important to support positive mental health. A growing body of research has linked sedentary behaviour with mental ill-health (e.g., depression and anxiety); however, little research has specifically investigated potential linkages between sedentary behaviour and stress. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the association between common types of sedentary behaviour and objectively-measured stress (as measured by hair cortisol levels) amongst women living in socioeconomically disadvantaged neighbourhoods. During 2012–2013, 72 women (aged 18–46 years) living in socioeconomically disadvantaged neighbourhoods self-reported sedentary behaviour (TV viewing, computer use, overall sitting time) and provided hair samples. Hair cortisol levels were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Linear regression models examined cross-sectional associations between sedentary behaviour and hair cortisol levels. There was no association between any type of sedentary behaviour (TV viewing, computer use, or overall sitting time) and hair cortisol levels in either crude or adjusted models. Sedentary behaviour may not be linked to hair cortisol level (stress) in women living in socioeconomically disadvantaged neighbourhoods. Further studies utilising objective measures of both sedentary behaviour and stress are required to confirm these findings.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/ijerph15040586
Field of Research MD Multidisciplinary
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30110507

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.