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Subclinical recurrent neck pain and its treatment impacts motor training-induced plasticity of the cerebellum and motor cortex

Baarbé, Julianne K, Yielder, Paul, Haavik, Heidi, Holmes, Michael WR and Murphy, Bernadette A 2018, Subclinical recurrent neck pain and its treatment impacts motor training-induced plasticity of the cerebellum and motor cortex, PLoS one, vol. 13, no. 2, pp. 1-19, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0193413.

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Title Subclinical recurrent neck pain and its treatment impacts motor training-induced plasticity of the cerebellum and motor cortex
Author(s) Baarbé, Julianne K
Yielder, Paul
Haavik, Heidi
Holmes, Michael WR
Murphy, Bernadette A
Journal name PLoS one
Volume number 13
Issue number 2
Article ID e0193413
Start page 1
End page 19
Total pages 19
Publisher Public Library of Science
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2018-02-28
ISSN 1932-6203
Keyword(s) pain sensation
cerebellum
myalgia
motor cortex
transcranial magnetic stimulation
control sequences
motor evoked potentials
musculoskeletal system
science & technology
Summary The cerebellum processes pain inputs and is important for motor learning. Yet, how the cerebellum interacts with the motor cortex in individuals with recurrent pain is not clear. Functional connectivity between the cerebellum and motor cortex can be measured by a twin coil transcranial magnetic stimulation technique in which stimulation is applied to the cerebellum prior to stimulation over the motor cortex, which inhibits motor evoked potentials (MEPs) produced by motor cortex stimulation alone, called cerebellar inhibition (CBI). Healthy individuals without pain have been shown to demonstrate reduced CBI following motor acquisition. We hypothesized that CBI would not reduce to the same extent in those with mild-recurrent neck pain following the same motor acquisition task. We further hypothesized that a common treatment for neck pain (spinal manipulation) would restore reduced CBI following motor acquisition. Motor acquisition involved typing an eight-letter sequence of the letters Z,P,D,F with the right index finger. Twenty-seven neck pain participants received spinal manipulation (14 participants, 18-27 years) or sham control (13 participants, 19-24 years). Twelve healthy controls (20-27 years) also participated. Participants had CBI measured; they completed manipulation or sham control followed by motor acquisition; and then had CBI re-measured. Following motor acquisition, neck pain sham controls remained inhibited (58 ± 33% of test MEP) vs. healthy controls who disinhibited (98 ± 49% of test MEP, P<0.001), while the spinal manipulation group facilitated (146 ± 95% of test MEP, P<0.001). Greater inhibition in neck pain sham vs. healthy control groups suggests that neck pain may change cerebellar-motor cortex interaction. The change to facilitation suggests that spinal manipulation may reverse inhibitory effects of neck pain.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0193413
Field of Research MD Multidisciplinary
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, Baarbé et al.
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30110537

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.