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The anticipation and outcome phases of reward and loss processing: a neuroimaging meta-analysis of the monetary incentive delay task

Oldham, Stuart, Murawski, Carsten, Fornito, Alex, Youssef, George, Yücel, Murat and Lorenzetti, Valentina 2018, The anticipation and outcome phases of reward and loss processing: a neuroimaging meta-analysis of the monetary incentive delay task, Human brain mapping, vol. 39, no. 8, pp. 3398-3418, doi: 10.1002/hbm.24184.

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Title The anticipation and outcome phases of reward and loss processing: a neuroimaging meta-analysis of the monetary incentive delay task
Author(s) Oldham, Stuart
Murawski, Carsten
Fornito, Alex
Youssef, GeorgeORCID iD for Youssef, George orcid.org/0000-0002-6178-4895
Yücel, Murat
Lorenzetti, Valentina
Journal name Human brain mapping
Volume number 39
Issue number 8
Start page 3398
End page 3418
Total pages 21
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Place of publication Chichester, Eng.
Publication date 2018-08
ISSN 1097-0193
Keyword(s) anticipation
loss
monetary incentive delay task
outcome
reward
science & technology
life sciences & biomedicine
neurosciences
neuroimaging
radiology, nuclear medicine & medical imaging
neurosciences & neurology
Summary The processing of rewards and losses are crucial to everyday functioning. Considerable interest has been attached to investigating the anticipation and outcome phases of reward and loss processing, but results to date have been inconsistent. It is unclear if anticipation and outcome of a reward or loss recruit similar or distinct brain regions. In particular, while the striatum has widely been found to be active when anticipating a reward, whether it activates in response to the anticipation of losses as well remains ambiguous. Furthermore, concerning the orbitofrontal/ventromedial prefrontal regions, activation is often observed during reward receipt. However, it is unclear if this area is active during reward anticipation as well. We ran an Activation Likelihood Estimation meta‐analysis of 50 fMRI studies, which used the Monetary Incentive Delay Task (MIDT), to identify which brain regions are implicated in the anticipation of rewards, anticipation of losses, and the receipt of reward. Anticipating rewards and losses recruits overlapping areas including the striatum, insula, amygdala and thalamus, suggesting that a generalised neural system initiates motivational processes independent of valence. The orbitofrontal/ventromedial prefrontal regions were recruited only during the reward outcome, likely representing the value of the reward received. Our findings help to clarify the neural substrates of the different phases of reward and loss processing, and advance neurobiological models of these processes.
Language eng
DOI 10.1002/hbm.24184
Field of Research 1109 Neurosciences
1702 Cognitive Science
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No-Derivatives licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30110539

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.