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Mass media campaigns' influence on prehospital behavior for acute coronary syndromes: an evaluation of the Australian Heart Foundation's warning signs campaign

Bray, Janet E, Stub, Dion, Ngu, Philip, Cartledge, Susie, Straney, Lahn, Stewart, Michelle, Keech, Wendy, Patsamanis, Harry, Shaw, James and Finn, Judith 2015, Mass media campaigns' influence on prehospital behavior for acute coronary syndromes: an evaluation of the Australian Heart Foundation's warning signs campaign, Journal of the American Heart Association, vol. 4, no. 7, pp. 1-9, doi: 10.1161/JAHA.115.001927.

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Title Mass media campaigns' influence on prehospital behavior for acute coronary syndromes: an evaluation of the Australian Heart Foundation's warning signs campaign
Author(s) Bray, Janet E
Stub, Dion
Ngu, Philip
Cartledge, Susie
Straney, Lahn
Stewart, Michelle
Keech, Wendy
Patsamanis, Harry
Shaw, James
Finn, Judith
Journal name Journal of the American Heart Association
Volume number 4
Issue number 7
Article ID e001927
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Place of publication Chichester, Eng.
Publication date 2015-07-06
ISSN 2047-9980
2047-9980
Keyword(s) acute coronary syndrome
emergency medical services
health education
mass media
prehospital delay
awareness
consumer health information
health promotion
odds ratio
propensity score
prospective studies
risk assessment
risk factors
time factors
Victoria
voluntary health agencies
science & technology
life sciences & biomedicine
cardiac & cardiovascular systems
cardiovascular system & cardiology
Summary Background
The aim of this study was to examine the awareness of a recent mass media campaign, and its influence on knowledge and prehospital times, in a cohort of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients admitted to an Australian hospital.

Methods and Results
We conducted 199 semistructured interviews with consecutive ACS patients who were aged 35 to 75 years, competent to provide consent, and English speaking. Questions addressed the factors known to predict prehospital delay, awareness of the campaign, and whether it increased knowledge and influenced actions. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine the association between campaign awareness and a 1‐hour delay in deciding to seek medical attention (patient delay) and a 2‐hour delay in presenting to hospital (prehospital delay). The median age was 62 years (IQR=53 to 68 years), and 68% (n=136) were male. Awareness of the campaign was reported by 127 (64%) patients, with most of these patients stating the campaign (1) increased their understanding of what is a heart attack (63%), (2) increased their awareness of the signs and symptoms of heart attack (68%), and (3) influenced their actions in response to symptoms (43%). After adjustment for other predictors, awareness of the campaign was significantly associated with patient delay time of ≤1 hour (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]=2.25, 95% CI: 1.03 to 4.91, P=0.04) and prehospital delay time ≤2 hours (AOR=3.11, 95% CI: 1.36 to 7.08, P=0.007).

Conclusions
Our study showed reasonably high awareness of the warning signs campaign, which was significantly associated with shorter prehospital decision‐making and faster presentation to hospital.
Language eng
DOI 10.1161/JAHA.115.001927
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2015, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution non-commercial licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30110544

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.