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Victimisation, poly-victimisation and health-related quality of life among high school students in Vietnam: a cross-sectional survey

Le, Minh T. H., Holton, Sara, Nguyen, Huong T., Wolfe, Rory and Fisher, Jane 2016, Victimisation, poly-victimisation and health-related quality of life among high school students in Vietnam: a cross-sectional survey, Health and quality of life outcomes, vol. 14, pp. 1-17, doi: 10.1186/s12955-016-0558-8.

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Title Victimisation, poly-victimisation and health-related quality of life among high school students in Vietnam: a cross-sectional survey
Author(s) Le, Minh T. H.
Holton, SaraORCID iD for Holton, Sara orcid.org/0000-0001-9294-7872
Nguyen, Huong T.
Wolfe, Rory
Fisher, Jane
Journal name Health and quality of life outcomes
Volume number 14
Article ID 155
Start page 1
End page 17
Total pages 17
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016-11
ISSN 1477-7525
Keyword(s) Adolescents
Health-related quality of life
Lower-middle income countries
Poly-victimisation
Violence
Adolescent
Crime Victims
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Psychology, Adolescent
Quality of Life
Sex Factors
Students
Vietnam
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Health Care Sciences & Services
Health Policy & Services
CHILD MALTREATMENT
UNITED-STATES
YOUTH
PROFILE
ADULTS
QUESTIONNAIRE
PREVENTION
BEHAVIORS
AMERICAN
Summary BACKGROUND: In high and upper-middle income countries poly-victimisation (exposure to multiple forms of victimisation) is associated with worse health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among adolescents. There is a lack of empirical evidence about these associations from low- and lower-middle income countries. The aims of this study were to examine the associations between exposure to 1) individual forms of victimisation and 2) poly-victimisation and the HRQoL of adolescents in Vietnam.

METHOD: A cross-sectional, anonymously-completed survey of high school students in Hanoi, Vietnam. Lifetime exposure to eight individual forms of victimisation and poly-victimisation were assessed using the Juvenile Victimisation Questionnaire Revised-2 (JVQ R2). Health-related quality of life was assessed using the Duke Health Profile Adolescent Version (DHP-A). Bi-variate analyses and multiple linear regressions were conducted to assess the associations between individual forms of victimisation, poly-victimisation and HRQoL among girls and boys.

RESULTS: In total 1616/1745 students (92.6 %) completed the questionnaire. Adolescent girls had significantly worse HRQoL than boys in all domains, except disability. Different forms of victimisation were associated with different HRQoL domains among girls and boys. Cyber victimisation was the most detrimental to girls' HRQoL while for boys maltreatment was the most detrimental. Experiences of poly-victimisation were associated with worse HRQoL in physical, mental, social and general health, lower levels of self-esteem and increased levels of anxiety, depression and pain domains among both sexes.

CONCLUSIONS: Among Vietnamese adolescents, experiences of individual forms of victimisation were associated with poorer HRQoL in specific domains; the most detrimental forms of victimisation varied for girls and boys. However, it was experiences of poly-victimisation that had the most detrimental impacts on the HRQoL of both sexes. Recognition of violence, including poly-victimisation, is still low in Vietnam. These data indicate that community education, prevention and early intervention programs to reduce violent victimisation and assist adolescents who have experienced it, with attention to gender differences, are needed in Vietnam.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12955-016-0558-8
Field of Research 1117 Public Health And Health Services
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30110586

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Nursing and Midwifery
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.