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Individual and contextual risk factors for chikungunya virus infection: the SEROCHIK cross-sectional population-based study

Fred, A., Fianu, A, Béral, M., Guernier, V., Sissoko, D., Méchain, M., Michault, A., Boisson, V., Gaüzère, B.-A., Favier, F., Malvy, D., Gérardin, P. and SEROCHIK group 2018, Individual and contextual risk factors for chikungunya virus infection: the SEROCHIK cross-sectional population-based study, Epidemiology and infection, vol. 146, no. 8, pp. 1056-1064, doi: 10.1017/S0950268818000341.

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Title Individual and contextual risk factors for chikungunya virus infection: the SEROCHIK cross-sectional population-based study
Author(s) Fred, A.
Fianu, A
Béral, M.
Guernier, V.ORCID iD for Guernier, V. orcid.org/0000-0002-0960-3874
Sissoko, D.
Méchain, M.
Michault, A.
Boisson, V.
Gaüzère, B.-A.
Favier, F.
Malvy, D.
Gérardin, P.
SEROCHIK group
Journal name Epidemiology and infection
Volume number 146
Issue number 8
Start page 1056
End page 1064
Total pages 9
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, England
Publication date 2018-06
ISSN 1469-4409
Keyword(s) Chikungunya
cross-sectional study
disease burden
population attributable fraction
risk factor
SEROCHIK group
Summary The purpose of the study was to weigh the community burden of chikungunya determinants on Reunion island. Risk factors were investigated within a subset of 2101 adult persons from a population-based cross-sectional serosurvey, using Poisson regression models for dichotomous outcomes. Design-based risk ratios and population attributable fractions (PAF) were generated distinguishing individual and contextual (i.e. that affect individuals collectively) determinants. The disease burden attributable to contextual determinants was twice that of individual determinants (overall PAF value 89.5% vs. 44.1%). In a model regrouping both categories of determinants, the independent risk factors were by decreasing PAF values: an interaction term between the reporting of a chikungunya history in the neighbourhood and individual house (PAF 45.9%), a maximal temperature of the month preceding the infection higher than 28.5 °C (PAF 25.7%), a socio-economically disadvantaged neighbourhood (PAF 19.0%), altitude of dwelling (PAF 13.1%), cumulated rainfalls of the month preceding the infection higher than 65 mm (PAF 12.6%), occupational inactivity (PAF 11.6%), poor knowledge on chikungunya transmission (PAF 7.3%) and obesity/overweight (PAF 5.2%). Taken together, these covariates and their underlying causative factors uncovered 80.8% of chikungunya at population level. Our findings lend support to a major role of contextual risk factors in chikungunya virus outbreaks.
Language eng
DOI 10.1017/S0950268818000341
Field of Research 1117 Public Health And Health Services
Copyright notice ©2018, Cambridge University Press
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30110643

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.