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Uncovering the neuroanatomical correlates of cognitive, affective and conative theory of mind in paediatric traumatic brain injury: a neural systems perspective

Ryan, Nicholas P., Catroppa, Cathy, Beare, Richard, Silk, Timothy J., Hearps, Stephen J., Beauchamp, Miriam H., Yeates, Keith O. and Anderson, Vicki A. 2017, Uncovering the neuroanatomical correlates of cognitive, affective and conative theory of mind in paediatric traumatic brain injury: a neural systems perspective, Social cognitive and affective neurosciences, vol. 12, no. 9, pp. 1414-1427, doi: 10.1093/scan/nsx066.

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Title Uncovering the neuroanatomical correlates of cognitive, affective and conative theory of mind in paediatric traumatic brain injury: a neural systems perspective
Author(s) Ryan, Nicholas P.ORCID iD for Ryan, Nicholas P. orcid.org/0000-0002-0878-8889
Catroppa, Cathy
Beare, Richard
Silk, Timothy J.
Hearps, Stephen J.
Beauchamp, Miriam H.
Yeates, Keith O.
Anderson, Vicki A.
Journal name Social cognitive and affective neurosciences
Volume number 12
Issue number 9
Start page 1414
End page 1427
Total pages 14
Publisher Oxford University Press
Place of publication Oxford, Eng.
Publication date 2017-09-01
ISSN 1749-5024
Keyword(s) Theory of Mind
brain injuries
childhood
magnetic resonance imaging
social cognition
Affect
Brain Injuries, Traumatic
Cerebellum
Child
Cognition
Empathy
Female
Glasgow Coma Scale
Gray Matter
Humans
Male
Mirror Neurons
Prospective Studies
Social Behavior
Science & Technology
Social Sciences
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Neurosciences
Psychology
Psychology, Experimental
Neurosciences & Neurology
HUMAN CEREBRAL-CORTEX
WEIGHTED IMAGING SWI
MIRROR NEURON
EXECUTIVE FUNCTIONS
FRONTAL-CORTEX
CHILDREN
NETWORK
Summary Deficits in theory of mind (ToM) are common after neurological insult acquired in the first and second decade of life, however the contribution of large-scale neural networks to ToM deficits in children with brain injury is unclear. Using paediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) as a model, this study investigated the sub-acute effect of paediatric traumatic brain injury on grey-matter volume of three large-scale, domain-general brain networks (the Default Mode Network, DMN; the Central Executive Network, CEN; and the Salience Network, SN), as well as two domain-specific neural networks implicated in social-affective processes (the Cerebro-Cerebellar Mentalizing Network, CCMN and the Mirror Neuron/Empathy Network, MNEN). We also evaluated prospective structure–function relationships between these large-scale neural networks and cognitive, affective and conative ToM. 3D T1- weighted magnetic resonance imaging sequences were acquired sub-acutely in 137 children [TBI: n = 103; typically developing (TD) children: n = 34]. All children were assessed on measures of ToM at 24-months post-injury. Children with severe TBI showed sub-acute volumetric reductions in the CCMN, SN, MNEN, CEN and DMN, as well as reduced grey-matter volumes of several hub regions of these neural networks. Volumetric reductions in the CCMN and several of its hub regions, including the cerebellum, predicted poorer cognitive ToM. In contrast, poorer affective and conative ToM were predicted by volumetric reductions in the SN and MNEN, respectively. Overall, results suggest that cognitive, affective and conative ToM may be prospectively predicted by individual differences in structure of different neural systems—the CCMN, SN and MNEN, respectively. The prospective relationship between cerebellar volume and cognitive ToM outcomes is a novel finding in our paediatric brain injury sample and suggests that the cerebellum may play a role in the neural networks important for ToM. These findings are discussed in relation to neurocognitive models of ToM. We conclude that detection of sub-acute volumetric abnormalities of large-scale neural networks and their hub regions may aid in the early identification of children at risk for chronic social-cognitive impairment.
Language eng
DOI 10.1093/scan/nsx066
Field of Research 1109 Neurosciences
1701 Psychology
1702 Cognitive Science
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution non-commercial licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30110692

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.