Openly accessible

The role of ectonucleotidases CD39 and CD73 and adenosine signaling in solid organ transplantation

Roberts, Veena, Stagg, John and Dwyer, Karen M. 2014, The role of ectonucleotidases CD39 and CD73 and adenosine signaling in solid organ transplantation, Frontiers in immunology, vol. 5, pp. 1-7, doi: 10.3389/fimmu.2014.00064.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
dwyer-roleofecton-2014.pdf Published version application/pdf 814.85KB 3

Title The role of ectonucleotidases CD39 and CD73 and adenosine signaling in solid organ transplantation
Author(s) Roberts, Veena
Stagg, John
Dwyer, Karen M.ORCID iD for Dwyer, Karen M. orcid.org/0000-0002-4376-9720
Journal name Frontiers in immunology
Volume number 5
Article ID 64
Start page 1
End page 7
Total pages 7
Publisher Frontiers Research Foundation
Place of publication Lausanne, Switzerland
Publication date 2014-02-18
ISSN 1664-3224
Keyword(s) adenosine
CD73
CD39
Treg
B cells
Summary Extracellular adenosine is a potent immunomodulatory molecule that accumulates in states of inflammation. Nucleotides such as adenosine triphosphate and adenosine diphosphate are release from injured and necrotic cells and hydrolyzed to adenosine monophosphate and adenosine by the concerted action of the ectonucleotidases CD39 and CD73. Accumulating evidence suggest that purinergic signaling is involved in the inflammatory response that accompanies acute rejection and chronic allograft dysfunction. Modification of the purinergic pathway has been shown to alter graft survival in a number of solid organ transplant models and the response to ischemia–reperfusion injury (IRI). Furthermore, the purinergic pathway is intrinsically involved in B and T cell biology and function. Although T cells have traditionally been considered the orchestrators of acute allograft rejection, a role for B cells in chronic allograft loss is being increasingly appreciated. This review focuses on the role of the ectonucleotidases CD39 and CD73 and adenosine signaling in solid organ transplantation including the effects on IRI and T and B cell biology.
Language eng
DOI 10.3389/fimmu.2014.00064
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2014, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30110729

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 12 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 10 Abstract Views, 3 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 10 Jul 2018, 10:50:12 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.