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DNA methylation biomarkers: cancer and beyond

Mikeska, Thomas and Craig, Jeffrey M. 2014, DNA methylation biomarkers: cancer and beyond, Genes, vol. 5, no. 3, pp. 821-864, doi: 10.3390/genes5030821.

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Title DNA methylation biomarkers: cancer and beyond
Author(s) Mikeska, Thomas
Craig, Jeffrey M.
Journal name Genes
Volume number 5
Issue number 3
Start page 821
End page 864
Total pages 44
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2014-09-16
ISSN 2073-4425
Keyword(s) cancer
diabetes
obesity
smoking
stress
autism
schizophrenia
bipolar disorder
depression
environmental factors
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Genetics & Heredity
EPIGENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION
MGMT PROMOTER METHYLATION
GLUCOCORTICOID-RECEPTOR GENE
POLYMERASE-CHAIN-REACTION
POSTTRAUMATIC-STRESS-DISORDER
DEPENDENT PROBE AMPLIFICATION
PRADER-WILLI-SYNDROME
MOLECULAR PATHOLOGICAL EPIDEMIOLOGY
CHRONIC LYMPHOCYTIC-LEUKEMIA
CARDIOVASCULAR-DISEASE RISK
Summary Biomarkers are naturally-occurring characteristics by which a particular pathological process or disease can be identified or monitored. They can reflect past environmental exposures, predict disease onset or course, or determine a patient’s response to therapy. Epigenetic changes are such characteristics, with most epigenetic biomarkers discovered to date based on the epigenetic mark of DNA methylation. Many tissue types are suitable for the discovery of DNA methylation biomarkers including cell-based samples such as blood and tumor material and cell-free DNA samples such as plasma. DNA methylation biomarkers with diagnostic, prognostic and predictive power are already in clinical trials or in a clinical setting for cancer. Outside cancer, strong evidence that complex disease originates in early life is opening up exciting new avenues for the detection of DNA methylation biomarkers for adverse early life environment and for estimation of future disease risk. However, there are a number of limitations to overcome before such biomarkers reach the clinic. Nevertheless, DNA methylation biomarkers have great potential to contribute to personalized medicine throughout life. We review the current state of play for DNA methylation biomarkers, discuss the barriers that must be crossed on the way to implementation in a clinical setting, and predict their future use for human disease.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/genes5030821
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2014, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30110753

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.