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The role of epigenetic change in autism spectrum disorders

Loke, Yuk Jing, Hannan, Anthony John and Craig, Jeffrey Mark 2015, The role of epigenetic change in autism spectrum disorders, Frontiers in neurology, vol. 6, pp. 1-18, doi: 10.3389/fneur.2015.00107.

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Title The role of epigenetic change in autism spectrum disorders
Author(s) Loke, Yuk Jing
Hannan, Anthony John
Craig, Jeffrey Mark
Journal name Frontiers in neurology
Volume number 6
Article ID 107
Start page 1
End page 18
Total pages 18
Publisher Frontiers
Place of publication Lausanne, Switzerland
Publication date 2015-05
ISSN 1664-2295
Keyword(s) epigenetics
methylation
autism spectrum disorders
epigenomics
gene expression
Summary Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are a heterogeneous group of neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by problems with social communication, social interaction, and repetitive or restricted behaviors. ASD are comorbid with other disorders including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, epilepsy, Rett syndrome, and Fragile X syndrome. Neither the genetic nor the environmental components have been characterized well enough to aid diagnosis or treatment of non-syndromic ASD. However, genome-wide association studies have amassed evidence suggesting involvement of hundreds of genes and a variety of associated genetic pathways. Recently, investigators have turned to epigenetics, a prime mediator of environmental effects on genomes and phenotype, to characterize changes in ASD that constitute a molecular level on top of DNA sequence. Though in their infancy, such studies have the potential to increase our understanding of the etiology of ASD and may assist in the development of biomarkers for its prediction, diagnosis, prognosis, and eventually in its prevention and intervention. This review focuses on the first few epigenome-wide association studies of ASD and discusses future directions.
Language eng
DOI 10.3389/fneur.2015.00107
Field of Research 1109 Neurosciences
1103 Clinical Sciences
1701 Psychology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2015 Loke, Hannan and Craig.
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30110771

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.