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Predicting suitable release sites for assisted colonisations: a case study of eastern barred bandicoots

Rendall, Anthony R, Coetsee, Amy L and Sutherland, Duncan R 2018, Predicting suitable release sites for assisted colonisations: a case study of eastern barred bandicoots, Endangered species research, vol. 36, pp. 137-148, doi: 10.3354/esr00893.

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Title Predicting suitable release sites for assisted colonisations: a case study of eastern barred bandicoots
Author(s) Rendall, Anthony RORCID iD for Rendall, Anthony R orcid.org/0000-0002-7286-9288
Coetsee, Amy L
Sutherland, Duncan R
Journal name Endangered species research
Volume number 36
Start page 137
End page 148
Total pages 12
Publisher Inter-Research
Place of publication Oldendorf, Germany
Publication date 2018
ISSN 1863-5407
Keyword(s) assisted colonization
island conservation
endangered species
Summary Assisted colonisations are increasingly being used to recover endangered or functionally extinct species. High quality habitat at release sites is known to improve the success of assisted colonisations, but defining high quality habitat can be challenging when species no longer inhabit their historical range. A partial solution to this problem is to quantify habitat use at release sites, and use results to inform assisted colonisation in the future. In this study, we quantified habitat use by the eastern barred bandicoot Perameles gunnii, functionally extinct on the Australian mainland, immediately after translocation to an island ecosystem. The release site, Churchill Island in Westernport, Victoria, Australia, has a mix of open woodlands and open pasture, providing a range of habitat conditions considered appropriate for nesting and foraging. A total of 16 bandicoots were radio-tracked for 30 d immediately post-release. Early survivorship was high (94%), with males found to have larger home ranges and move greater distances from their first nest than females. Males and females initially used structurally complex habitats for nesting and foraging; as they became more established, males moved further from their release point and both sexes increased their use of open habitats during nightly activity. Female home ranges had limited overlap, suggesting intra-sexual territoriality. Males exhibited larger overlapping home ranges. Our results assist in quantifying habitat use of bandicoots immediately post-release and will be used to inform future assisted colonisations of the species to larger islands, in the presence of feral cats.
Language eng
DOI 10.3354/esr00893
Field of Research 05 Environmental Sciences
06 Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, the authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30111470

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.