Openly accessible

It’s not like it’s life or death or whatever: young people’s understandings of social media data

Pangrazio, Luci and Selwyn, Neil 2018, It’s not like it’s life or death or whatever: young people’s understandings of social media data, Social media and society, vol. 4, no. 3, pp. 1-9, doi: 10.1177/2056305118787808.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
pangrazio-itsnotlikeitslife-2018.pdf Published version application/pdf 261.55KB 1

Title It’s not like it’s life or death or whatever: young people’s understandings of social media data
Author(s) Pangrazio, LuciORCID iD for Pangrazio, Luci orcid.org/0000-0002-7346-1313
Selwyn, Neil
Journal name Social media and society
Volume number 4
Issue number 3
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher Sage Publications
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2018-07
ISSN 2056-3051
Keyword(s) social media
personal data
data literacies
teenagers
privacy
security
Summary Young people’s engagements with social media now generate large quantities of personal data, with “big social data” becoming an increasingly important “currency” in the digital economy. While using social media platforms is ostensibly “free,” users nevertheless “pay” for these services through their personal data—enabling advertisers, content developers, and other third parties to profile, predict, and position individuals. Such developments have prompted calls for social media users to adopt more informed and critical stances toward how and why their data are being used—that is, to build “critical data literacies.” This article reports on research that explores young social media users’ understandings of their personal data and its attendant issues. Drawing on research with groups of young people (aged 13–17 years), the article investigates the consequences of making third party (re)uses of personal data openly available for social media users to interpret and make critical sense of. The findings provide valuable insights into young people’s understandings of the technical, social, and cultural issues that underpin their ability to engage with, and make sense of, social media data. The article concludes by considering how research into critical data literacies might connect in more meaningful and effective ways with everyday lived experiences of social media use.
Language eng
DOI 10.1177/2056305118787808
Field of Research 130306 Educational Technology and Computing
200102 Communication Technology and Digital Media Studies
Socio Economic Objective 950202 Languages and Literacy
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution non-commercial licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30111692

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Education
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 11 Abstract Views, 1 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 24 Jul 2018, 11:18:02 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.