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Parent characteristics associated with approval of their children drinking alcohol from ages 13 to 16 years: prospective cohort study

Sharmin, Sonia, Kypri, Kypros, Wadolowski, Monika, Bruno, Raimondo, Khanam, Masuma, Aiken, Alexandra, Hutchinson, Delyse, Najman, Jackob M., Slade, Tim, McBride, Nyanda, Attia, John and Mattick, Richard P. 2018, Parent characteristics associated with approval of their children drinking alcohol from ages 13 to 16 years: prospective cohort study, Australian and New Zealand journal of public health, vol. 42, no. 4, pp. 347-353, doi: 10.1111/1753-6405.12811.

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Title Parent characteristics associated with approval of their children drinking alcohol from ages 13 to 16 years: prospective cohort study
Author(s) Sharmin, Sonia
Kypri, Kypros
Wadolowski, Monika
Bruno, Raimondo
Khanam, Masuma
Aiken, Alexandra
Hutchinson, DelyseORCID iD for Hutchinson, Delyse orcid.org/0000-0003-3221-7143
Najman, Jackob M.
Slade, Tim
McBride, Nyanda
Attia, John
Mattick, Richard P.
Journal name Australian and New Zealand journal of public health
Volume number 42
Issue number 4
Start page 347
End page 353
Total pages 7
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication Chichester, Eng.
Publication date 2018-08
ISSN 1753-6405
Keyword(s) adolescent drinking
approval
drinking
parent
socioeconomic status
Summary Objective: We investigated parent sociodemographic and drinking characteristics in relation to whether they approved of their children drinking at ages 13, 14, 15 and 16 years.

Methods: We collected data annually from 2010–2014, in which 1,927 parent–child dyads, comprising school students (mean age 12.9 years at baseline) and one of their parents, participated. Our operational definition of parental approval of children drinking was based on the behaviour of parents in pre‐specified contexts, reported by children. We measured parents’ drinking with the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test‐Consumption (AUDIT‐C) scale and performed logistic regression to estimate associations between exposures and each wave of outcomes.

Results: Parents’ approval of their children's drinking increased from 4.6% at age 13 years to 13% at age 16 years and was more common in parents of daughters than parents of sons (OR 1.62; 95%CI: 1.23 to 2.12). Parents in low‐income families (OR 2.67; 1.73 to 4.12), single parents (OR 1.62; 1.17 to 2.25), parents with less than a higher school certificate (OR 1.54; 1.07 to 2.22), and parents who drank more heavily (OR 1.17; 1.09 to 1.25) were more likely to approve of their child drinking.

Conclusions: Socially disadvantaged parents were more likely to approve of their children drinking alcohol.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12811
Field of Research 170113 Social and Community Psychology
1117 Public Health And Health Services
1402 Applied Economics
1605 Policy And Administration
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2018, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No-Derivatives licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30111731

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.