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Quantitation of the cellular content of saliva and buccal swab samples

Theda, Christiane, Hwang, Seo Hye, Czajko, Anna, Loke, Yuk Jing, Leong, Pamela and Craig, Jeffrey M 2018, Quantitation of the cellular content of saliva and buccal swab samples, Scientific reports, vol. 8, pp. 1-8, doi: 10.1038/s41598-018-25311-0.

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Title Quantitation of the cellular content of saliva and buccal swab samples
Author(s) Theda, Christiane
Hwang, Seo Hye
Czajko, Anna
Loke, Yuk Jing
Leong, Pamela
Craig, Jeffrey M
Journal name Scientific reports
Volume number 8
Article ID 6944
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2018
ISSN 2045-2322
Keyword(s) diagnostic markers
histology
buccal swabs
saliva
oral sampling
medical research
buccal cells
blood leukocytes
epigenetic studies
Papanicolaou staining
epithelial cells
leukocytes
microscopy
Summary Buccal swabs and saliva are the two most common oral sampling methods used for medical research. Often, these samples are used interchangeably, despite previous evidence that both contain buccal cells and blood leukocytes in different proportions. For some research, such as epigenetic studies, the cell types contributing to the analysis are highly relevant. We collected such samples from twelve children and twenty adults and, using Papanicolaou staining, measured the proportions of epithelial cells and leukocytes through microscopy. To our knowledge, no studies have compared cellular heterogeneity in buccal swab and saliva samples from adults and children. We confirmed that buccal swabs contained a higher proportion of epithelial cells than saliva and that children have a greater proportion of such cells in saliva compared to adults. At this level of resolution, buccal swabs and saliva contained similar epithelial cell subtypes. Gingivitis in children was associated with a higher proportion of leukocytes in saliva samples but not in buccal swabs. Compared to more detailed and costly methods such as flow cytometry or deconvolution methods used in epigenomic analysis, the procedure described here can serve as a simple and low-cost method to characterize buccal and saliva samples. Microscopy provides a low-cost tool to alert researchers to the presence of oral inflammation which may affect a subset of their samples. This knowledge might be highly relevant to their specific research questions, may assist with sample selection and thus might be crucial information despite the ability of data deconvolution methods to correct for cellular heterogeneity.
Language eng
DOI 10.1038/s41598-018-25311-0
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30111836

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.