Openly accessible

Perinatal maternal mental health, fetal programming and child development

Lewis, Andrew J., Austin, Emma, Knapp, Rebecca, Vaiano, Tina and Galbally, Megan 2015, Perinatal maternal mental health, fetal programming and child development, Healthcare, vol. 3, no. 4, pp. 1212-1227, doi: 10.3390/healthcare3041212.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
lewis-perinatalmaternal-2015.pdf Published version application/pdf 216.01KB 1

Title Perinatal maternal mental health, fetal programming and child development
Author(s) Lewis, Andrew J.ORCID iD for Lewis, Andrew J. orcid.org/0000-0002-2519-7976
Austin, Emma
Knapp, Rebecca
Vaiano, Tina
Galbally, Megan
Journal name Healthcare
Volume number 3
Issue number 4
Start page 1212
End page 1227
Total pages 16
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2015-11-26
ISSN 2227-9032
Keyword(s) child temperament
cortisol
epigenetics
fetal programming
growth
mental health in pregnancy
perinatal depression and anxiety
placenta
Summary Maternal mental disorders over pregnancy show a clear influence on child development. This review is focused on the possible mechanisms by which maternal mental disorders influence fetal development via programming effects. This field is complex since mental health symptoms during pregnancy vary in type, timing and severity and maternal psychological distress is often accompanied by higher rates of smoking, alcohol use, poor diet and lifestyle. Studies are now beginning to examine fetal programming mechanisms, originally identified within the DOHaD framework, to examine how maternal mental disorders impact fetal development. Such mechanisms include hormonal priming effects such as elevated maternal glucocorticoids, alteration of placental function and perfusion, and epigenetic mechanisms. To date, mostly high prevalence mental disorders such as depression and anxiety have been investigated, but few studies employ diagnostic measures, and there is very little research examining the impact of maternal mental disorders such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, eating disorders and personality disorders on fetal development. The next wave of longitudinal studies need to focus on specific hypotheses driven by plausible biological mechanisms for fetal programming and follow children for a sufficient period in order to examine the early manifestations of developmental vulnerability. Intervention studies can then be targeted to altering these mechanisms of intergenerational transmission once identified.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/healthcare3041212
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2015, the Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30111855

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 7 Abstract Views, 2 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 27 Jul 2018, 12:38:17 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.