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Is gender inequity a risk factor for men reporting poorer self-rated health in the United States?

Kavanagh, Shane A., Shelley, Julia M. and Stevenson, Christopher 2018, Is gender inequity a risk factor for men reporting poorer self-rated health in the United States?, PLoS One, vol. 13, no. 7, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0200332.

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Title Is gender inequity a risk factor for men reporting poorer self-rated health in the United States?
Author(s) Kavanagh, Shane A.
Shelley, Julia M.
Stevenson, ChristopherORCID iD for Stevenson, Christopher orcid.org/0000-0003-4026-5719
Journal name PLoS One
Volume number 13
Issue number 7
Article ID e0200332
Total pages 15
Publisher Public Library of Science
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2018-07-17
ISSN 1932-6203
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Multidisciplinary Sciences
Science & Technology - Other Topics
LIFE EXPECTANCY
MULTILEVEL ANALYSIS
INCOME INEQUALITY
MASCULINE NORMS
WOMENS STATUS
HELP-SEEKING
ALCOHOL-USE
MORTALITY
SEX
ATTITUDES
Summary Theoretical approaches suggest that gender inequity increases men's health risks. Previous findings from the United States support this contention, however only a small number of health outcomes have been explored. This study extends the range of health outcomes examined by using a cross-sectional, multilevel analysis to investigate whether measures of state-level gender inequity are predictors of men's self-rated health. Data were derived primarily from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System and the full-case data set included 116,594 individuals nested within 50 states. Gender inequity was measured with nine variables: higher education, women's reproductive rights, abortion provider access, elected office, management, business ownership, labour force participation, earnings and relative poverty. Covariates at the individual level were age, income, education, race/ethnicity, marital status and employment status. Covariates at the state level were income inequality and gross domestic product per capita. In fully adjusted models for all-age men the reproductive rights (OR 1.06 95% CI 1.01-1.11), abortion provider access (OR 1.11 95% CI 1.05-1.16) and earnings (OR 1.06 95% CI 1.02-1.12) measures all predicted an increased risk of men reporting poorer self-rated health for each 1 standard deviation increase in the gender inequity z-score. The most consistent effect was seen for the 65+ age group where the reproductive rights (OR 1.09 95% CI 1.03-1.16), abortion provider access (OR 1.15 95% CI 1.09-1.21), elected office (OR 1.06 95% CI 1.01-1.11) and earnings (OR 1.10 95% CI 1.04-1.16) measures all showed a significant effect. These findings provide evidence that some aspects of gender inequity increase the risk of poorer self-rated health in men. The study contributes to a growing body of literature implicating gender inequity in men's health patterns.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0200332
Field of Research MD Multidisciplinary
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, Kavanagh et al.
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30112080

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.