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Patient safety issues and concerns in Bhutan's healthcare system: a qualitative exploratory descriptive study

Pelzang, Rinchen and Hutchinson, Alison M 2018, Patient safety issues and concerns in Bhutan's healthcare system: a qualitative exploratory descriptive study, BMJ open, vol. 8, no. 7, pp. 1-11, doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2018-022788.

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Title Patient safety issues and concerns in Bhutan's healthcare system: a qualitative exploratory descriptive study
Author(s) Pelzang, Rinchen
Hutchinson, Alison MORCID iD for Hutchinson, Alison M orcid.org/0000-0001-5065-2726
Journal name BMJ open
Volume number 8
Issue number 7
Article ID e022788
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher BMJ Publishing Group
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2018-09
ISSN 2044-6055
Keyword(s) clinical governance
health policy
qualitative research
quality in health care
healthcare professionals
patient safety
Bhutan
Summary OBJECTIVES: To investigate what healthcare professionals perceived and experienced as key patient safety concerns in Bhutan's healthcare system.

DESIGN: Qualitative exploratory descriptive inquiry.

SETTINGS: Three different levels of hospitals, a training institute and the Ministry of Health, Bhutan.

PARTICIPANTS: In total, 140 healthcare professionals and managers.

METHODS: Narrative data were collected via conversational in-depth interviews and Nominal Group Meetings. All data were subsequently analysed using thematic analysis strategies.

RESULTS: The data revealed that medication errors, healthcare-associated infections, diagnostic errors, surgical errors and postoperative complications, laboratory/blood testing errors, falls, patient identification and communication errors were perceived as common patient safety concerns. Human and system factors were identified as contributing to these concerns. Instituting clinical governance, developing and improving the physical infrastructure of hospitals, providing necessary human resources, ensuring staff receive patient safety education and promoting 'good' communication and information systems were, in turn, all identified as processes and strategies critical to improving patient safety in the Bhutanese healthcare system.

CONCLUSION: Patient safety concerns described by participants in this study were commensurate with those identified in other low and middle-income countries. In order to redress these concerns, the findings of this study suggest that in the Bhutanese context patient safety needs to be conceptualised and prioritised.
Language eng
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2018-022788
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution non-commercial licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30112325

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Centre for Quality and Patient Safety Research
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.